Wed | Dec 13, 2017

Celebrating the heritage of Jamaica

Published:Sunday | August 27, 2017 | 12:00 AM
Oware Board
Yabba ware
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Oware Board

 

This board is used to play a number of variants of the African game known as Oware (Awari), which is among the oldest known games that require intellectual skill.

The objective of the game is to capture more seeds than one's opponent.

Oware boards may be elaborately carved or simple and functional. they may include a pedestal or be hinged to fold lengthwise or crosswise and latch for portability and storage, with the seeds inside.

Reflecting traditional African values, players of Owari encourage the participation of onlookers, making it, perhaps, the most social two-player game. In recreational play, it is normal for spectators to discuss the game in progress and to advise the players. Games may provide a focus for entertainment and meeting others.

 

Did you know?

 

The game of Oware or variations of it have had an important role in teaching arithmetic to African children.

The rules of Oware have also been applied to solving computer problems.

 

Yabba ware

 

'Yabba' is an Akan (Ashante) term that describes earthenware pots and bowls. Yabbas have been made and used in Jamaica from the earliest arrival of Africans in the island and were an important cottage industry controlled mainly by Afro-Jamaican women. The West African coil technique was traditionally passed down from mother to daughter and they were still being sold in the markets well into the 20th century. Ma Lou, and now, her daughter, Munchie, is the last Master in the Jamaican tradition.

 

Did you know?

 

Ma Lou started learning how to make clay pots at approximately nine years old. She was taught mainly by her mother, an uncle's wife, and three maternal aunts. By the age of 13, she started to work as a potter full time, and from that point on, began a career that would span a period of 67 years.