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Website tracks job history to weed out dishonest recruits

Published:Sunday | August 2, 2015 | 8:00 AMTameka Gordon
A screen grab of the finalworker.com website.

A local businessman who created a website aimed at catching job recruits who lie about their work history or omit information on previous employment, has collated data on more than 400 people and is promoting it as a human resource tool for companies.

The site, finalworker.com, was founded four years ago by Patrick Walker who also operates an air conditioning company, Comfort Systems.

Walker said he developed the site "based on my frustration, disappointment and the expensive lessons I have learnt by employing persons who have not been truthful in the application process". It allows companies to upload termination notices when they fire employees as well as search a database to see other companies where the applicants may have worked.

"What it is saying is that the employee, in applying for a job, needs to be honest and say 'I was at so and so'. Do not leave it out because there must be a reason why you would not want that information to be known," Walker said.

Finalworker.com also collects termination notices published in the press over the years. It allows present and past employers to share information about employees, Walker said, to lessen the chances of hiring someone who is dishonest or who was fired for "unsavoury and suspicious reasons".

"Persons who have been dishonest in their workplace, many of them, when they apply for a job, they just leave out that employment record. I have spoken to a lot of employers who welcome it," he said of the site.

The name, he said, suggests companies would have found the best fit or the 'final worker' for the job after doing proper background checks.

Job matching

On the other hand, job seekers can upload their resumes, as the site also allows job matching.

Walker said he and another partner have poured roughly $100,000 in the online service.

To date, some 284 companies have registered with the site with 261 of those entering data on persons they no longer employ, Walker said. It has data on 457 people who have been separated from their companies, while some 657 job seekers have registered.

"It is intended to bring some discipline to the employees. They have to understand that you just can't just get up and walk off peoples' jobs and then hide the information because you don't want the new employer to find out," Walker said.

He insisted that employees are not being placed at a disadvantage, but simply allows the employer to do a background check on individuals before taking them on for jobs.

The businessman also believes that the labour laws tend to work more in the favour of workers than companies, and that his website brings balance to the relationship.

"It's not a balanced arrangement with the labour laws. It does give both persons the option for taking the matter to court but the employee knows that the employer is unlikely to go to court to get them to honour their side of the agreement. So, it's to bring some sort of balance to the system and some sort of responsible behaviour on the part of the employee that you can't do things that hurt your company and walk away," Walker said.

tameka.gordon@gleanerjm.com