Sun | May 28, 2017

IDB willing to finance waste to energy projects

Published:Wednesday | May 10, 2017 | 5:00 AMMcPherse Thompson
IDB Lead Investment Officer Stefan Wright speaks at the Gleaner Editors' Forum on Tuesday, May 9, 2017.

The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) said it would consider financing projects for waste to energy in Jamaica, but cautioned that the cost of doing so would have to be around US$0.12 per kilowatt hour for it to make sense to consumers.

"We could finance waste to energy," but "at the end of the day, it's going to come down to the cost. I think that's a key component which I don't know if it has been fully analysed," said lead investment officer at the IDB, Stefan Wright.

He said that if solar energy was currently being produced at US$0.12/kWh,"it makes no sense financing waste-to-energy at US$0.20/kWh because JPS [Jamaica Public Service Company] won't buy that."

Renewable energy is a focus of the Inter-American Investment Corporation, the private-sector arm of the IDB which last year reorganised three of its four private-sector windows specifically to be more strategic, align with the IDB's country strategy and become more effective in terms of how the Bank deploys private sector resources, Wright told a Gleaner Editors' Forum on Tuesday.

"We are working with entities in Jamaica now to finance renewable energy projects," said Wright, noting that Jamaica has done a good job in bringing more renewable energy on the grid and reducing the 90 per cent oil bill, "and we are very much interested in partnering with those entities who want financing".

Referring to Jamaica's main garbage-disposal sites, including the Riverton dump in Kingston, Wright said it would be good to be able to use those resources in a more environmentally friendly way, "but at the end of the day it must make sense for consumers".

He also pointed to the Government's efforts, announced by Prime Minister Andrew Holness with the formation of an enterprise team in October last year, to manage the State's waste-to-energy programme, contracting out of solid-waste management and collection and divestment of the Riverton City landfill.

At that time, Holness was quoted as saying that the Government had received more than 30 expressions of interests to either bid on the waste-to-energy programme or to collect solid waste or both.

"We stand ready to finance projects which come out of that," said the investment officer, noting that after the tender process is completed, entities wishing to invest in the facility would seek financing from the IDB to make the business a reality.

 

key requirements

 

However, he pointed out that one of the key requirements is that such entities engaging in such energy supply programmes must obtain power purchase agreements from the JPS.

"So we are certainly willing to help to participate in that," he said. "We will finance any sustainable project which is helping to generate economic growth," he added, noting that the IDB was offering loans between US$5 million and US$200 million per project, "and we don't have any country limits now in terms of what we can finance".

Wright said "we are looking at a number of projects and renewable energy and waste energy is something that we would certainly consider."

General manager for the IDB's Caribbean Country Department, Therese Turner-Jones, who also participated in the forum, said she has been to a series of renewable-energy conferences where private-sector interests offer various solutions, "and they look at the Caribbean as being ripe for investment because we've done so little".

Comparing Jamaica with Hawaii, where the goal is 100 per cent renewables, Turner-Jones, noted that the US state is "almost there".

"So it's possible (for Jamaica) to do it. The technology exists," she added.

JPS, which controls power distribution, is now reporting that renewables should account for around 12 per cent of its electricity production this year. Jamaica is aiming for a mix of 30 per cent by 2030.

mcpherse.thompson@gleanerjm.com