Fri | Nov 17, 2017

Devon Dick | Stop the sexual abuse of our girls

Published:Thursday | November 9, 2017 | 12:00 AM

Professor Nuts, deejay and a judge in Magnum Kings and Queens, stated in a TV interview with ER (Entertainment Report) that today's dancehall players are too open, sexually, when compared with the older generation. That recent interview speaks to a problem. Too often, there is no subtlety in the lyrics; most are sexually explicit and some are violent. It means that the young are being exposed to sexually explicit lyrics which are not age appropriate. There is regulation on TV with a rating guide. However, in the public space, such as public functions and school entertainment, there is little or no guidance.

Any cursory glance of school activities on YouTube will validate the point. In addition, at some public sessions, there are adults who encourage the young and vulnerable to be sexually expressive in explicit ways with inducements of a few dollars. These adults are promoting slackness. Even Beenie Man was critical of such public display. There is sexual abuse of girls. Big women jump on young boys. It is no longer about dancing, but it is now adult entertainment of public simulation of aggressive sexual conduct. As a society, we are creating a generation who will not know the difference between what should be private, what should be personal and what should be for public consumption. Some even use social media for private matters.

In the United States (US), there is an attempt at purging the entertainment world of those who sexually harass young people. Some persons were fooled into believing that because Donald Trump was elected as president of the US, in spite of his own voice boasting about sexual assault of women, that it would mean sexual harassment would not become an issue. And in the United Kingdom, the political class is under pressure for inappropriate conduct towards the vulnerable.

But what about Jamaica? Is there sexual exploitation in the entertainment industry and by the political class? At a recent coffee break during the meeting of leaders at Boulevard Baptist Church, two young professionals remarked that sexual harassment is a serious problem at the workplace. There are too many anecdotal stories. There are also stories about the police force and pastors. Who will bell the cat? These attitudes towards females and the young is born out of an ethos of women being perceived as subservient and inferior to males who are entitled to the bodies of women at anytime, anywhere and anyhow.

 

DISTORTED VIEW

 

This attitude shows that men are not into mutual love and mutual commitment. It is a failure to perceive that God's intention for humans was for complementarity of the man-woman relationship. Instead, men have become self-absorbed, self-centred and selfish, thus making the goal of sexual intercourse not one of mutual satisfaction to the glory of God but an attempt to brag, boast and beat one's chest. And unfortunately, this evil attitude towards women has been often justified by religious theology.

Religion, in general, and Christianity, in particular, needs to be in the vanguard to protect the young and women from sexual abuse. Sadly, it is said, according to Christine Caine, that even now, women are stoned to death for committing the act of adultery in India and Pakistan. In addition, females are raped and sold into slavery in Syria. Ill-treatment of women is a worldwide problem, with 100 million women being reported missing and 5,000 girls murdered yearly by parents because it is claimed that they have brought shame on the family.

We need social engineering where sexual abuse is frowned upon and our girls are respected, celebrated, appreciated, esteemed and valued as God intended it.

- Rev Devon Dick is pastor of the Boulevard Baptist Church in St Andrew. He is author of 'The Cross and the Machete', and 'Rebellion to Riot'. Send feedback to columns@ gleanerjm.com.