Mon | Oct 15, 2018

Dior puts on dancing shoes to kick off Paris Fashionweek

Published:Tuesday | September 25, 2018 | 12:00 AM
Thanks to Dior, dance and theatricality were at the heart of Paris Fashionweek’s first day of spring shows.
Dior turned to dance to produce the music and visuals for its Spring-Summer collection.
Thanks to Dior, dance and theatricality were at the heart of Paris Fashionweek's first day of spring shows.
A model wears a creation for Christian Dior’s Spring-Summer 2019 ready-to-wear fashion collection.
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PARIS (AP):

Dance and theatricality were at the heart of Paris Fashionweek's first day of spring shows, as American stars Blake Lively and Shailene Woodley gushed over Dior's balletic presentation at the famed Longchamps racecourse.

 

DIOR'S ODE TO DANCE

 

To clouds of falling white petals, dancers clad in patterned bodysuits twisted gracefully to the clicking sound of a metronome.

This season, Dior turned to dance to produce the music and visuals for its Spring-Summer collection, infused with diaphanous, tulle-rich gowns.

The house enlisted the talents of choreographer Sharon Eyal for a sublime and balletic contemporary dance performance that ran throughout the Spring-Summer show.

The runway hall was spacious enough to house the dozen roving dancers, thanks to a marquee constructed in the grounds of the historic Longchamps racecourse, which dates to the 19th century and has been the site of some of former Dior designer John Galliano's most memorable couture shows.

 

BALLECTIC LOOKS

 

As ethereal as a layer of tulle, with the corset replaced by a simple tank top.

That's how the House of Dior described the key idea behind designer Maria Grazia Chiuri's soft and supple 87-piece show in monochrome and nude.

Few risks were taken in this display.

But this didn't matter since the fashion, inspired by a dancer's wardrobe, was primarily aimed at being simple and feminine.

Jumpsuits, straps and cords featured on silhouettes that were either tight on the torso, evoking a leotard, or diaphanous and floaty, channelling a tutu.

Ballet slippers evoked the dance tradition very literally, while open-toe heels featured criss-cross strapping in a take on a ballerina's shoe.

There was a softness to the entire show, accentuated by the gentle, round shoulders that were set off romantically by dappled and misty lighting.