Sun | Dec 8, 2019

Tosh Alexander to bare her soul - Artiste part of Caribbean Women’s Power Lunch panel on Sunday

Published:Friday | November 22, 2019 | 12:10 AMStephanie Lyew/Gleaner Writer
Recording artiste Tosh Alexander.
Recording artiste Tosh Alexander.

Six weeks ago, recording sweetheart Tosh Alexander was celebrating her latest single, Games, officially being added to Pandora’s ‘Women in Reggae’ playlist, and now she is preparing to be part of one of the most prominent panels, the Caribbean Women’s Power Lunch (CWPL), curated by business management expert Kerra Denel.

Though not exclusively linked to music, the event has been a platform for several blossoming female professionals in diverse fields balancing careers in business, science and technology, to art and entertainment with family. It has been held in Toronto, Los Angeles, Trinidad and Tobago, and will be in Miami next Sunday, November 24.

This staging of CWPL features Tosh Alexander; as well as Trinidadian Farrah Chow-Quan, owner of Carnival Kicks; Professor Rain Jarrett, daughter of the late Irvin ‘Carrot’ Jarrett, formerly of Third World; Dr Jacqueline James-Lyttle, who is the wife of St Vincent soca artiste Kevin Lyttle; wellness expert Steph Stanford; and health stylist and TV host Carla Hill.

Tosh Alexander is the first Jamaican female reggae-dancehall artiste to be featured on the panel, which in an interview with The Gleaner, she said, “is an honour to just be able to share a space with such amazing women, where I will not only have an opportunity to network, but engage with and learn from others.”

Soft-spoken but outspoken, the Ready Fi Dem singer said she is preparing to share the story of her life and career, and speak on the topics that may arise out of the discussion.

“The day to day is seeing the glamorous side of things, the awards people win or the way a person looks in the public eye, but I feel like the lunch is going to be the sides that are not so glamorous, the struggles that make us realise we are not by ourselves in the vulnerable, yet, comfortable space,” she said.

“With Kerra [Denel], there isn’t a set limitation on the topics, it is all about bringing you and your authentic self – the good, the bad and the indifferent – to share experiences that mean something to the speakers and has, in one way or another, morphed them into who they are. There is power in that.”

Alexander noted that while it will indirectly impact her network, she is not caught up with making her numbers grow, but to set an example for others who participate in the future and knowing people will get to know and appreciate who Tosh Alexander is.

“I am looking forward to honour that and share my stories in hopes of people that come after me next year to feel to be open, vulnerable and share their entire story with the thought in mind that, ‘Tosh Alexander did it before me and Angela Hunte (American-Trinidadian singer and songwriter) did it before she did it’, because a lot of the times it can be hard to share and it is motivation. I believe it adds to build a strong sense of community and is also important for the Caribbean diaspora as well to know these stories, and for me to bask in a great moment where I can inspire and be inspired,” she said.

stephanie.lyew@gleanerjm.com