Sun | May 19, 2019

JWNF encourages female empowerment

Published:Monday | April 22, 2019 | 12:21 AM
Chantel Harrison (left), distillery quality team lead, New Yarmouth, presenting students of Race Course Primary with the book, ‘The Sky is Not the Limit’, during the 2019 J. Wray & Nephew Foundation’s ‘Read Across Jamaica Day’ activities.
Chantel Harrison (left), distillery quality team lead, New Yarmouth, presenting students of Race Course Primary with the book, ‘The Sky is Not the Limit’, during the 2019 J. Wray & Nephew Foundation’s ‘Read Across Jamaica Day’ activities.

There were giggles and laughter all around by the girls with their Ayanna Dixon-authored book, The Sky is not the Limit.

Titled for the times, the educational material not only satisfied the gift-giving purpose, but also engaged young minds, which is all a part of keeping up with the United Nation’s theme for this year, ‘Think equal, build smart, innovate for change, which focuses on innovative ways in which we can advance gender equality and the empowerment of women, particularly in the areas of social protection systems, access to public services, and sustainable infrastructure.

Social Inclusion

This also fits within J.Wray & Nephew Foundation’s social inclusion pillar, which seeks to provide opportunities of empowerment for girls in the communities in which they serve. Through engagement and interaction, a volunteer cadre of female staff members, who work in non-traditional areas, encouraged girls to think creatively about their future careers and be innovative in transforming Jamaica.

The benefactors of 230 books and such invaluable lessons were grade Ssix girls in six schools in Kingston, Clarendon, and St Elizabeth.

Anya Duncan, environmental specialist, and Antonette Douglas, senior packaging specialist, visited Seaview Primary, while Kamala Bennett, IT services manager, engaged Seaward Primary’s girls. In St Elizabeth, Agriculture Manager Susan Pryce McIntosh and Farm Supervisor Sandy McKenzie went to Siloah Primary, while Maintenance Planner Annesha Adamson was at Holland Primary. In Clarendon, Chantel Harrison, fermentation and production technician, played host at Race Course Primary, as did Gaye Bailey, irrigation manager, at Gimme-Mi-Bit Primary.

Reflecting on the feedback at Race Course Primary, Chantal said: “A young lady came to me afterwards and said she wanted to be a scientist as well.”

Bennett recounted: “The session at Seaward Primary was awesome. The girls were very receptive to the message shared and the session was also very interactive.

“They had a lot of fun, as well going through the books given and coming up with other professions that were not seen,” added Kamala. “It was my pleasure to take part in this event.”