Sat | Dec 3, 2016

Law school graduates urged to have integrity

Published:Monday | September 29, 2014 | 12:00 AM
Richard Dane-Andrew O'Gilvie accepts his Legal Education Certificate from Jacqueline Samuels-Brown (left), chairman, Council of Legal Education.
The Gleaner's Shernett Robinson, accepts her Legal Education Certificate from Jacqueline Samuels-Brown (left), chairman, Council of Legal Education, during The Council of Legal Education, Norman Manley Law School, ceremony for the presentation of graduates, held on Saturday at the Karl Hendrickson Auditorium, Jamaica College. PHOTOS Winston Sill/Freelance Photographer
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Barbara Ellington, Public Affairs Editor

Justice Hilary Phillips Q.C. has challenged graduates of the Norman Manley Law School (NMLS) to practise their craft honestly, zealously and with integrity, while maintaining the honour and dignity of the profession and the courts and treating fellow attorneys with respect. She was the guest speaker at Saturday's ceremony for the presentation of the 2014 graduates at the Karl Hendrickson Auditorium, Jamaica College Auditorium in St Andrew.

Offering advice to the 258 graduates, Phillips said: "Do not delegate the responsibility for a client's account to anyone and avoid unlawful sales or understating the purchase price of a property."

Citing the Law Reform Fraudulent Transaction Act, the Proceeds of Crime Act, the Security Interest in Personal Property Act, the Cybercrimes Act, the Security Interest in Personal Property Act and other relatively new pieces of legislation, Phillips told the graduates to familiarise themselves with these new laws and guard against their use and abuse by persons in the society. She advised the young lawyers to ensure that they know how to access and use evidence gathered via live/video links or other methods of communication in the technologically advancing era in which we now live.

"It is imperative that you familiarise yourselves with these Acts. Be prepared to challenge legislation if you know that citizens' rights are being infringed and do your work well, as people are counting on you," Phillips charged the graduates.

She also reminded them that at a time when money laundering was rife, they should pay attention to unusual financial transactions as it was their duty to report same following consultation with and permission from their clients, otherwise it would be a breach of trust.

Among the graduates were Shernett Robinson, The Gleaner's special projects editor, and Richard O'Gilvie, son of Anthony O'Gilvie, human resource and administration manager. Outstanding graduates were Kerri-Ann Allen who received 13 prizes, Kerri-Ann Mew who got 9, as well as Stephen Watson and Kimberly Morris was the most outstanding students for 2013-2014. The valedictory address was given by Ralston Dickson.

barbara.ellington@gleanerjm.com