Wed | Sep 20, 2017

London defiant as IS claims attack by British ex-con

Published:Friday | March 24, 2017 | 3:00 AM
People write messages in chalk on the ground at a vigil for the victims of Wednesday's attack, at Trafalgar Square in London yesterday

LONDON (AP):

Authorities yesterday identified a 52-year-old Briton as the man who mowed down pedestrians and stabbed a policeman to death outside Parliament in London, saying he had a long criminal record and once was investigated for extremism - but was not currently on a terrorism watch list.

As millions of Londoners returned to work a day after a rampage that killed four victims and injured at least 30, British Prime Minister Theresa May had a message for other attackers: "We are not afraid."

"Today, we meet as normal - as generations have done before us, and as future generations will continue to do," she said to lawmakers' cheers in the House of Commons.

The Islamic State group claimed responsibility for Wednesday's attack, which police said was carried out by Khalid Masood, a UK-born resident of the West Midlands in central England. Masood plowed a rented SUV into pedestrians on London's Westminster Bridge, killing an American man and a British woman and injuring more than 30 people of almost a dozen nationalities. He then fatally stabbed a policeman inside the gates of Parliament before being shot to death by an officer.

A 75-year-old victim on the bridge died late yesterday of his wounds, police said.

 

VICTIMS IDENTIFIED

 

The dead were identified as Kurt Cochran, 54, of Utah and British school administrator Aysha Frade, 43 - both struck on the bridge - and 48-year-old Constable Keith Palmer, a 15-year veteran of the Metropolitan Police. The 75-year-old victim was not identified.

Police arrested eight people - three women and five men - on suspicion of preparing terrorist acts as authorities sought Masood's motive and possible support network. One arrest was in London, while the others were in Birmingham. Police said they were searching properties in Birmingham, London and Wales.

As police investigated, Parliament got back to business, opening the day with a minute's silence for the victims. May saluted the heroism of police and the bravery of ordinary Londoners.

As dusk fell, a silent vigil was held by several thousand people in London's Trafalgar Square, where the bells of Big Ben could be heard in the distance.