Mon | Oct 14, 2019

Kamala Harris opens US presidential bid

Published:Tuesday | January 22, 2019 | 12:15 AM
In this January 9, 2019, photo, Senator Kamala Harris, D-California, greets the audience at George Washington University in Washington during an event kicking off her book tour. Harris, a first-term senator and former California attorney general known for her rigorous questioning of US President Donald Trump’s nominees, entered the Democratic presidential race on Monday.
FILE- In this Sept. 6, 2018, file photo Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., listens as President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh, answers her question during the third day of Kavanaugh’s Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. Harris, a first-term senator and former California attorney general known for her rigorous questioning of President Donald Trump’s nominees, entered the Democratic presidential race on Monday. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
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Kamala Harris, a first-term senator and former California attorney general known for her rigorous questioning of United States President Donald Trump’s nominees, entered the Democratic presidential race on Monday. Vowing to “bring our voices together”, Harris would be the first woman to hold the presidency and the second African-American if she succeeds.

Harris, who grew up in Oakland, California, and is a daughter of parents from Jamaica and India, is one of the earliest high-profile Democrats to join what is expected to be a crowded field. She made her long-anticipated announcement on ABC’s ‘Good Morning America’.

“I am running for president of the United States,” she said. “And I’m very excited about it.”

The 54-year-old portrayed herself as a fighter for justice, decency and equality in a video distributed by her campaign as she announced her bid. “They’re the values we as Americans cherish, and they’re all on the line now,” Harris says in the video. “The future of our country depends on you and millions of others lifting our voices to fight for our American values.”

On ABC, she cited her years as a prosecutor in asserting: “My entire career has been focused on keeping people safe. It is probably one of the things that motivates me more than anything else.”

Harris launched her presidential bid as the nation observes what would have been the 90th birthday of slain civil-rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. The timing was a clear signal that the California senator – who has joked that she had a “stroller’s-eye view” of the civil-rights movement because her parents wheeled her and her sister Maya to protests – sees herself as another leader in that fight.

She abandoned the formality of launching an exploratory committee, instead going all-in on a presidential bid.

Formal campaign launch

She plans a formal campaign launch in Oakland on January 27. The campaign will be based in Baltimore, with a second office in Oakland.

Harris joins what is expected to be a wide-open race for the Democratic presidential nomination. There’s no apparent front runner at this early stage, and Harris will face off against several Senate colleagues.

Senators Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Kirsten Gillibrand of New York have both launched exploratory committees. Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey, Sherrod Brown of Ohio and Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota are also looking at the race.

If Booker enters the race, he and Harris could face a fierce competition for support from black voters.

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, who unsuccessfully sought the 2016 Democratic nomination, is also considering a campaign. Several other Democrats have already declared their intentions, including former Maryland Representative John Delaney and former Obama administration housing chief Julian Castro.

Harris launches her campaign fresh off of a tour to promote her latest memoir, The Truths We Hold, which was widely seen as a stag etter for a presidential bid.

She is already planning her first trip to an early primary state as a declared candidate. On Friday, Harris will travel to South Carolina to attend the Pink Ice Gala in Columbia, which is hosted by a South Carolina chapter of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, which Harris pledged as an undergraduate student at Howard University. The sorority, founded more than 100 years ago, is a stronghold in the African-American community.

South Carolina, where black voters make up a large share of the Democratic electorate, is likely to figure heavily into Harris’ prospects. And early voting in Harris’ home state of California will overlap with the traditional early nominating contests, which could give Harris a boost.