Mon | May 27, 2019

CRH Cancer Centre gets boost from Hanover Charities, Chukka Foundation

Published:Saturday | May 18, 2019 | 12:18 AMBryan Miller/Gleaner Writer
Cornwall Regional Hospital CEO Dr Derrick Harvey addressing the audience at the ceremony to announce the donation of a critical piece of cancer-care equipment to the hospital by two Hanover-based charities.
Cornwall Regional Hospital CEO Dr Derrick Harvey addressing the audience at the ceremony to announce the donation of a critical piece of cancer-care equipment to the hospital by two Hanover-based charities.

Western Bureau:

As the thrust to transform and improve medical care at the Cornwall Regional Hospital (CRH) in Montego Bay, St James, continues, two Hanover-based charities have stepped up to render cancer-care assistance to the health facility.

The Hanover Charities and Chukka Foundation have jointly acquired a cardiac physiological monitor machine for the hospital’s Cancer Care Centre. The announcement was made at a presentation ceremony at the Round Hill Hotel and Villas in Hanover on Tuesday.

According to Sheona Muschett, manager of the Chukka Foundation, and Katrin Casserly, who leads Hanover Charities, the machine was purchased from funds generated at the 10th Polo Charity event, a joint fundraiser held in February in Sandy Bay, Hanover.

“Thanks to our Polo Charity event, the Hanover Charities and Chukka Foundation will be able to support our communities by implementing projects in our schools, healthcare facilities and provide scholarships from the proceeds,” said Muschett. “We will continue to be able to make a positive impact and assist our community members in reaching their full potential.”

The decision to assist the Cancer Care Centre at the CRH was driven by the fact that treasurer of the Hanover Charities, Roy Ten-Fah, recently lost his battle with cancer after treatment at the facility.

In expressing gratitude for the donation, CRH Senior Medical Officer Dr Derrick Harvey said that the machine aligns perfectly with the efforts to rehabilitate and modernise the hospital.

According to Harvey, cancer patients of all ages are coming to the hospital for care, but the hospital is short on modern technology.

“What you have done is brought us into the 21st century in terms of monitoring vital signs,” said Harvey, speaking to the capabilities of the Linac machine.

The Gleaner has learned that the machine, which cost approximately $500,000, should be in place at the CRH within six weeks.