Thu | Oct 17, 2019

NCEL rebuffs Speid’s claims of principal candidates being shafted

Published:Saturday | September 14, 2019 | 12:06 AMNickoy Wilson/Gleaner Writer
Owen Speid
Dr Taneisha Ingleton
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Dr Taneisha Ingleton, principal of the National College for Educational Leadership (NCEL), has rebuffed claims by Jamaica Teachers’ Association (JTA) President Owen Speid that the education ministry is acting in breach of its Code of Regulation in the appointment of principals.

Speid has accused the ministry of bypassing teachers who do not have a certificate from the NCEL for principal positions.

“That is as best erroneous … . It is indeed unfortunate that we are hearing that there are principals who have been in positions for six years and have not been appointed on the basis that they do not have NCEL certification. The Ministry of Education does not prevent any principal who has been in the position as provisional for more than two years from being appointed,” Ingleton said.

She was speaking yesterday on Power 106’s ‘Morning Agenda’.

The NCEL principal explained that the organisation offers two programmes designed to ensure that aspiring and current principals are aware of procurement procedures, financial management, instructional leadership, discipline, and natural procedures as well as general administration.

Speid, who was also on the programme, said that the estimated $40 million allocated to operate the professional training facility is a waste of taxpayers’ money, citing that the training offered by NCEL could done through already existing systems.

“There are so many other ways and structures and appraisals that they do yearly. The principals go through this rigid appraisal process, and many of them have come out meeting or exceeding expectations. We have a quality-education circle system, where all principals meet in their quality-education circles monthly,” he said.

But Ingleton asserted that Speid was misunderstanding his role as JTA president and the role of the education ministry.

“The Ministry of Education has a responsibility for the systematic professional development of its principals and school leaders and all the stakeholders in its circle … . The NCEL was set up to ensure that there was systematic preparation, identification, and certification of school leaders.

“It was identified in the task force report on educational reform. That is the basis on which we are moving. It is not anecdotal. It is based on empirical evidence and on critical inquiry,” Ingleton said.

nickoy.wilson@gleanerjm.com