Thu | Oct 17, 2019

Peters fellowship in prayer

Published:Monday | September 16, 2019 | 12:15 AMJason Cross/Gleaner Writer

The Reverend Devon Dick (centre), pastor of the Boulevard Baptist Church, prays for Dr Peter Phillips (right), president of the People’s National Party (PNP), and Peter Bunting (left) during a Unity and Healing Service, which was held at the church yesterday.
The Reverend Devon Dick (centre), pastor of the Boulevard Baptist Church, prays for Dr Peter Phillips (right), president of the People’s National Party (PNP), and Peter Bunting (left) during a Unity and Healing Service, which was held at the church yesterday.

In the wake of a bruising leadership race, the Reverend Devon Dick yesterday prompted Dr Peter Phillips and Peter Bunting to hug each other and shake hands in front of a congregation at the Boulevard Baptist Church in St Andrew.

Phillips retained the presidency of the party, after Bunting received 1,351 votes, 76 fewer than the incumbent. The race was beset with claims and counterclaims of vote buying.

The former contenders participated in a special worship service for the People’s National Party (PNP) which was attended by members and associates of the organisation.

Dick invited both Peters to join him for prayer at the altar. “I pray for reconciliation and healing. Things were said that should not have been said,” Dick noted as he made intercession for the politicians.

Karl Kirkland, the PNP’s protocol officer, said that the gesture was “a symbol of the party assuring that after such contest, the party is united to serve the people of Jamaica and move forward to offer themselves as representatives of the people. It takes maturity”.

Former Bunting campaign manager and member of parliament for St Ann North West, Dayton Campbell, told The Gleaner, “We are PNP and remain committed to the progress of the party. “

“We accept the will of the delegates and will play our role to return the party to government.” In his sermon, Dick said that the country was in need of a moral agenda, which should include a zero-tolerance stance on corruption and sexual assault.

“If we are not careful, we are going to say that these are the good old days, because it will get worse. We need to come together as a people, all of us, around a moral agenda and core values that are just, responsible, sustainable and wholesome for a better Jamaica.”