Tue | Aug 22, 2017

Can we trust this government?

Published:Thursday | October 22, 2015 | 10:00 AM

THE EDITOR, Sir:

A number of developments have taken place in recent times that have caused many persons, like me, to have less confidence in the truthfulness of some of the things the government has been telling us.

Take the issue of the health issue that is causing the death of babies in some of our hospitals. Sometime ago, the government did an audit of the health system that it has yet to release to the public. I heard a senior official saying that reputations are easily lost and hard to gain. As such, it could not release the findings of the audit as people may forever shun some hospitals.

I wonder if there is anything in that audit that is connected to what is killing those babies now? I also wonder, if that audit was released, if the lives of some of those babies could have been saved? Why is the government being so secretive on this?

Of course, I agree with the principle of the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ), but why is the government trying very hard to convince us that we must do away with the Privy Council and adopt the CCJ by withholding vital information that we would need to come to a decision?

One of the reasons why we are being told that the CCJ is better is because of its easier accessibility, which is much cheaper and the fact that we don't need visas for it. However, a few years ago, the Privy Council actually offered to eliminate the need for us to travel to Britain "for justice", by offering to come here. Now why would the government conveniently forget to tell us this?

Then we have the fiasco with this British prison. On the one hand, we have the British telling us that this prison is a done deal, but on the other hand, we have the government telling us that it is not. Who is right here

I would not even mention the issue of the "great" logistics hub that is supposed to save Jamaica. That one is too confusing, even for me.

Maybe this government is so sure that it will win the next elections that it doesn't see the need for us to trust it. All this talk of theirs about trust is turning out to be just that - talk.

Michael A. Dingwall