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Domestic or international: which terrorism is worse?

Published:Tuesday | December 1, 2015 | 12:00 AM

THE EDITOR, Sir:

Whenever we think of terrorism, we immediately conjure up an image of a group of Arab Muslims armed with automatic weapons attacking civilian targets and slaughtering hundreds of innocent people while invoking the name of Allah.

Terrorism is a strategy that has been employed throughout the history of mankind. Muslims and Arabs do not have a monopoly on terrorism, and there are two faces to this scourge.

For decades, the United States has experienced terror from the hands of American citizens, who were not Arabs or Muslims. On August 19, 1995, Timothy McVeigh, an 'all-American boy', who received a Bronze Star for service in the Gulf War, bombed a federal building in Oklahoma City, killing 168 people and causing injury to more than 600.

For several years, American citizens affiliated with evangelical churches have been bombing, burning and killing doctors and employees of Planned Parenthood, an organisation that provides health care to women and families.

One of the most egregious forms of terrorism is the treatment meted out to young black teenagers in cities across the US by police departments. Many unarmed boys have been shot down in the streets by some rogue police for questionable reasons. Many believe it is a strategy to spread fear in black communities.

The recent attack on Paris was a despicable act by Belgian terrorists. Our prime minister was quick to send her condolence. Ironically, there does not seem to be equal concern for the more than 1,000 Jamaicans who are slaughtered by local terrorists on a yearly basis.

Where is the alarm and the strategy to free the country from these terrorists who now hold the country hostage? Domestic terrorism is just as bloody and despicable as international terrorism. Christianity, Judaism and Islam are all guilty of terror, and so are the countries that fly these religious flags.

R. OSCAR LOFTERS

lofters1@aol.com

Kingston 8