Sun | Sep 24, 2017

Buggery backers endorsing nastiness

Published:Saturday | December 12, 2015 | 12:00 AM

THE EDITOR, Sir:

I write in response to the Gleaner editorial of December 11, 2015, titled 'Good luck to Maurice Tomlinson' (for challenging in the courts the buggery laws).

Yes, Mr Editor, we knew you were always an LGBT backer and do think it prudent to give people the 'right' to make contact with, and engage, the body's waste, particularly faecal matter, in the anal orifice, in the name of consensual pleasure.

I am also aware that you hold this view even in the face of the public-health concerns of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other global health officials, as well as the righteous demands of the God to whom we sing our national anthem.

By the way, consenting adults can, and do also, engage in incest, which is still immoral (even by your standards, I am sure), even if done by consenting adults, and so this argument about consenting adults is NOT a magical escape from something being immoral, or stupid, or depraved.

In addition, no heterosexual feels cheated by anti-buggery laws, since I have never heard of any organisation led by straight people insisting on their right to engage anuses. It's simply gay people and their supporters making it SEEM that heterosexuals are bothered by the existence of buggery laws. The Gleaner felt it had to try to make that lame argument to advance its cause.

 

IT'S A GAY THING

Let's be honest: The push to have the right to engage anuses, despite all that comes along with it, is a GAY thing - plain and simple!

Why should a country abolish a law that prohibits males wallowing ('penilistically') in the faeces of animals, another male, or a female, or which prohibits having decided contact with all the body's waste and connected bacteria or viruses (whether animal, or human), with the potential to create a public-health issue?

A country that likewise prohibits harming oneself with hard drugs, or exposing oneself to potential hurt via not wearing seat belts or crash helmets on bikes, is exhibiting common sense and real concern for its citizens (who may wish to engage in dangerous practices) by rightly prohibiting dangerous and perverted tendencies.

DERRICK GILLESPIE

ddgillespie@live.com

St Elizabeth