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Letter of the Day: The big bad wolf or the perfect pig?

Published:Thursday | January 7, 2016 | 1:00 AM
Do you remember the times Chris Gayle thought live television interviews provided the perfect opportunity for speed-mating with the fair journalists?

THE EDITOR, Sir:

Do you remember that interview where Ninjaman insisted on referring to journalist Emily Crooks as 'baby', and her firmness in correcting him that her name was 'Ms Crooks' or 'Emily'? Remember how quickly 'baby' was reduced to 'ooman' once she sought to claim her dignity as the moderator of the conversation?

Remember that time Pearnel Charles, with tongue firmly in cheek, corrected the television journalist by asserting that the jagged crevice in the constituency was 'Portia's hole' and of no interest to him?

Remember how much belly laughter those incidents induced?

Do you remember the times Chris Gayle thought live television interviews provided the perfect opportunity for speed-mating with the fair journalists? With mischievous eyes, a toothy grin, and lips moistened for effect, it is still up for debate whether the celebrated batsman was channelling the big bad wolf or the perfect pig.

Have you ever been in public with your mother or sister and noticed the haze of the crassness and vulgarity through which they must navigate?

Ask your daughters how many times a week they are touched by strange men on the way home from school as they are forcibly 'loaded' on to moving vehicles. Ask them how much like a 'baby' they feel as they are dragged off and then deposited on to a speeding bus by a strange male.

Many have said this is Jamaican culture and that sort of machismo has been irresistibly alluring to women long before Annie Palmer ever set foot at Rose Hall Great House.

These people think the furore about the propriety of Gayle's most recent remarks to the Australian journalist is much ado about nothing and speculate that Gayle and his fair lady might have shared a tryst after the cameras stopped rolling.

Apparently, Jamaican masculinity is so irresistible that all standards of decorum, respect, and civility are to be set aside in its presence. Swagger is a more desirable quality than manners and it is certainly not uncool to be uncouth.

Jamaicans now reside in every corner of the globe and are beginning to face the reality that what is permissible a yard is anathema abroad. We should therefore better prepare our young men for the realities of life outside our small island in countries where concepts like mutual respect are not uncommon. We must decide if we want our men to be ambassadors or convicts.

Brian-Paul Welsh

brianpaul.welsh@gmail.com