Fri | Aug 18, 2017

Letter of the Day| Holness is no 'bway' under Phillips

Published:Thursday | June 23, 2016 | 6:11 AM

THE EDITOR, Sir:

It is ridiculous that Peter Phillips is now saying that Prime Minister Andrew Holness must table in the house of Parliament his financials that he made public last week. Why can't Dr Phillips just let go of the issue? It seems to me that Phillips is just playing pure politics. But even as he is doing so, he is losing credibility and becoming irrelevant. Can Portia Simpson Miller not say to Phillips, enough is enough?

The call by Peter Phillips that Mr Holness table his financials in Parliament is also redundant and disrespectful to the Integrity Commission of Parliament. The commissioners are responsible for collecting and reviewing them independently. So is it that Dr Phillips have some degree of doubt in the ability of the commissioners to do their jobs, and do it diligently?

Mr Holness is not a boy under Peter Phillips, and he (Holness) should not be pressured into doing something that Phillips himself is not willing to do. In fact, the country hasn't even received word yet from Opposition Leader Portia Simpson Miller as to whether she will be releasing her financials.

Peter Phillips is demonstrating that he lacks the political judgement needed to lead the People's National Party. In addition to that, we are now being exposed to a side of Peter Phillips: that is the obstructive side of him. He has shown us that not only is he obstructive but he is also arrogant. Also, his constant shifting of the goalpost with respect to this issue is demonstrative of his lack of humility.

 

COVERT CAMPAIGN

 

Make no mistake, Peter Phillips is leading a covert campaign against Prime Minister Holness' character and he should stop it. No one else in the PNP is preoccupied with this issue. In fact, the Julian Robinson-led appraisal committee has said explicitly that by introducing the issue and being so preoccupied by it, the PNP lost focus and ultimately lost the election. Despite having that fact established, Phillips is still at it.

The prime minister has given commitment that he will seek to introduce legislation that will mandate the prime minister, the finance minister and their counterparts to release their financials public. Let us wait to see what mechanisms will be put in place to facilitate this, instead of trying to deliberately muddy the waters all because of politics. Lastly, we must not forget that Peter Phillips and his PNP administration had the opportunity to strengthen the anti-corruption bill and didn't.

Dr Nathan Newman

Development Researcher

Lecturer, International Business