Sun | Oct 22, 2017

Politicians to blame for voter apathy

Published:Thursday | December 1, 2016 | 12:00 AM

THE EDITOR, Sir: I am not surprised with how the local government elections turned out. One factor was the limited options to choose from and again for the lack of voters.

Confidence in the parties and their style of politics is waning among Jamaican voters, especially within the youth majority. The apathy and non-participation are testament of the youth wanting much more from the elected but high-and-mighty officials, who after the elections feel they've put themselves in the position. On Monday, I witnessed people going about their normal business with not a care in the world and even looking surprised at the sight of the polling division on Molynes Road.

 

NO LONGER FOOLED

 

Jamaicans realise the lies spewed from delegates don't match their reality, the reality being the notable absence of the members of parliament in communities, and not just there, but in the parish councils and the parishes. Then, as soon as one party comes in, they blame the other party. Jamaicans are no longer fooled by promises, patronage and thinly veiled political threats. Kevin O'Brien Chang on CVM made a point that connected: Jamaicans have access to things to make them comfortable, thus the need for the politicians is void. It is possible that Jamaicans think the country is fine, but Jamaica cannot be all right when US dollar is suffocating ours, the Government wanted to spend $600 million on possibly free debushing and people need access to good-paying jobs. Mr Chang rightly said that Jamaicans preferred to go to the dance, despite everything else.

Therefore, the situation begs the question: what do Jamaicans actually want? Jamaica is small compared to the US, Britain and South Korea, all who have people demonstrating for accountability from their governments.

I am not going to blame the voters; their silence, or rather the lack of inked fingers, spoke volumes. Jamaicans exist in a vacuum; it is they and then the government. Each successive government has forced the people to fend for themselves, and they have succeeded, quietly reducing dependence. There is no need to rely on the politicians.

Colette Campbell