Tue | Mar 19, 2019

Sex candy furore overblown

Published:Friday | November 2, 2018 | 12:00 AM

THE EDITOR, Sir:

The article 'Act fast on restricting LGBT-influenced candy' (Gleaner, October 29, 2018) shows how heterosexuals do the exact thing they accuse the LGBT community of doing: sexualising children.

The controversial candy in question, which anti-gay advocates say has a logo that appears to look like male genitalia, has not even the slightest resemblance to such. Also, a parent's reference in another article, that he/she was "uneasy" at the sight of the liquid spouting from the tube, was disturbing. Why should the first thought be that children's consumption of the candy mimics a sexual act?

Cis-heterosexual individuals often argue on the basis that LGBTs are imposing an 'unnatural' lifestyle on the wider society and accuse the community of sexualising their children when many cartoons and TV shows for children, over decades, have included plots and story lines which include the glorifying of sexual relationships between adolescents and even small children. It is also extremely concerning that the focus of the candy is its alleged message through its colourful package and not its contents.

As stated by the article, the candy is sugar-based, as the sweet is made of boiled sugar, glucose syrup and citric acid. Oh that the living in our Jamaican society were more concerned with the health and well-being of their children rather than obsessing with the lifestyles of individuals they claim to despise.

The excessive sugar contents of the candy can lead to diseases, the loss of energy and other health issues that have a negative impact of the minds and bodies of developing children. The candy should not be sold on the school grounds or by vendors situated outside the school gates, as the candy and its alarming contents are in no way beneficial to the health of developing students. The ministry should implore parents, schools and vendors to keep the health of the young children in mind when allowing or providing them with any other unhealthy sugar products, including juices, snacks, pastries, and even other candies.

JANE ANDERSON

Equality Youth JA Youth Advocate