Mon | May 25, 2020

Letter of the Day | Please ensure office spaces are safe for work

Published:Saturday | May 23, 2020 | 12:12 AM

THE EDITOR, Madam:

HAVING BEEN working from home for over two months, I am particularly grateful that we should start to see some normalcy return as we head back to the physical workplace come June 1. I also want to use this opportunity to thank the Government of Jamaica which, in my opinion, has done a good job in dealing with the foreseeable consequences of this COVID-19 pandemic.

I do have an urgent concern, which I am asking the Government to fully consider when drafting the new workplace protocol with the Private Sector Organisation of Jamaica.

I work in a fairly small building with a company whose revenue, like many others, has been negatively affected by the coronavirus. So I understand that the safety measures being put in place for staff must be within reasonable cost.

UNACCEPTABLE

It is, however, unacceptable that employers use this as a reason for doing only the bare minimum required by law and do not use discretion to effect adequate protective measures given the conditions in which their employees must operate.

The managers at my workplace each have their own partitioned offices, however, the remaining staff shares small open areas. In most cases, our desks are attached to each other. We have workers who suffer from severe allergies that cause them to sneeze quite frequently, along with persons who have persistent coughs. We jokingly refer to our office space as “the flu conduit” since very often, when one person gets sick, the majority of the others do, too.

Recently, a group of us made contact with our superiors as well as the company’s general manager about the issue and presented some possible solutions, including the installation of cost-effective plastic screens alongside the top edges of closely positioned desks. Similar screens are now in place at the cashier counters of several supermarkets. Our appeals have been flatly refused, and we now expect to return to the office building and to have to work in the same close quarters as before, without sufficient protection.

I, therefore, make this appeal on behalf of my co-workers and other employees in a similar situation. As we eagerly anticipate going back to work, please make it mandatory for employers to have at least six feet of space between work stations or to install adequate protective barriers where space is limited. Otherwise, the unfortunate truth is that some decision-makers who remain unaffected in their own partitioned offices will not give such thought to the safety of their own staff.

JAMIE SMITH

Kingston