Tue | Oct 17, 2017

Father seeks to unite adoptive son with biological parents

Published:Friday | January 16, 2015 | 11:03 PM
Raphael Bloise, aka Skilly Bango.
CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS Ramon and daughter.
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Cecelia Campbell-Livingston

Gleaner Writer

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS ago reggae artiste Raphael Bloise, aka Skilly Bango had a strange encounter which saw him saddled with a young baby, who eventually became a permanent member of his family. He legally adopted the baby (Ramon) who at the time was just a few months old and moved him to Brooklyn, New York.

Today, Ramon is a mature young man who is well on his way to achieving the American dream. He is a talented basketball player and is currently enrolled as a business major at a prominent college in New York. While Ramon grew up calling Bango dad, he was told at a young age that his biological dad was not known. And while Ramon accepted his fate, he still yearns to know his biological parents. He would also love to know if he has biological siblings in Jamaica or the rest of the world that he does not know.

"Right now, it's like looking for a needle in a haystack, but I have to try to help him find his biological parents," Skilly Bango reasoned. "I love Ramon as if he came from my own loins, but I think I owe it to him to help him find his roots."

After running in dead end leads for years, he has turned to Rural Xpress for help.

The artiste who has recorded songs such as Mama, Save Us and I Can See Clearly, described the sequence of events that occurred in 1990 in Kingston that led to his being Ramon's father. It all unfolded while he was at the Molynes Road gas station and saw a taxi driver (Issac) whom he knew.

"The driver had a baby in the car and told me a girl gave him an address for the father to drop off the baby. The girl claimed she was late for work, however, when Isaac went to the address, the guy he met there said the baby wasn't his. With no address for the mother, he took the baby to the Half-Way-Tree police station only to be told to renew his search for the mother as 'the government had too many cases of mothers leaving their children behind,' he related.

It was at this point that Skilly Bango told the taxi driver the baby could rest at his place for the night and they would figure out what to do in the morning.

Bango said he checked his friend, fellow artiste General Trees for clues on the whereabouts of the mother, but came up empty.

Now, the father of five boys (four biological) said he would love for his adoptive son's parents to "know the work Jah has done" for him.

The only clues he can offer on finding the biological parents is a link to General Trees and the taxi driver who still ply the Molynes Road route in Kingston.

"The father is somebody that General Trees know from Drewsland. In fact, I spoke to Trees last August when he was at a reggae show in Florida, and he told me the father had moved abroad to the USA or Canada, but he was not sure about his exact whereabouts. Unfortunately, we don't have any information about the mother," he told The Gleaner.

"I am hoping this story will provide us some new leads. It has been over 20 years, but I am confident someone out there has the information we need to get a breakthrough in the case," he said.

Ironically, the St Ann born artiste and past student of St Anne's and Tivoli High schools is working on his new album titled Such Is Life that will be released soon.

rural@gleanerjm.com