Wed | May 24, 2017

Several police stations still severely undermanned, court system suffers

Published:Wednesday | June 3, 2015 | 6:27 PM
The Supreme Court in Kingston. The country's court system has also been severely affected by the industrial action taken by rank and file members of the Jamaica Constabulary Force.
The Negril Police Station. It appears that some members of the Jamaica Constabulary Force are continuing their industrial action today.
1
2

It appears that some members of the Jamaica Constabulary Force are continuing their industrial action today, despite an injunction granted by the Supreme Court last night. 

About 1,000 restive rank and file members of the JCF called in sick yesterday as they pressed their demands for an improved wage offer from the Government.

According to the attorney general’s office the injunction bars all police personnel from causing or attempting to carry out acts to cause disaffection among the members of the Force for the next 28 days.

It also prohibits any actions which could cause or causes the withholding of service by members of the force.

The attorney general, Patrick Atkinson warned the federation’s executive that failure to comply with the terms of the Supreme Court Order will result in them being in contempt of court and liable to having their assets being confiscated.

The Gleaner/Power 106 News Centre understands that several police stations are still severely undermanned.

The country's court system has also been severely affected by the industrial action taken by rank and file members of the Jamaica Constabulary Force for a second straight day.

Only uniformed police officers were present in two of the Corporate Area Resident Magistrate's court.

At the start of court earlier, the four benches usually reserved for police men and women were empty.

So too was the holding area for prisoners in the court.

As was the case yesterday, no one was available to transport prisoners to court.

The situation was the same at the Home Circuit and Gun Courts where officials could only process cases involving persons who were out on bail.