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Mazda CX-5: Merging the concept of sporty design and an SUV

Published:Wednesday | September 16, 2015 | 9:00 AMKareem Latouche
2016 Mazda CX-5
Simplicity and sound
Skyactive
Multimedia Unit
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The SUV crossover market is becoming more competitive by the year and Mazda hopes to stir things up with the CX-5. Equipped with its Skyactive technology and aggressive nose, Mazda aims to give the average driver a different experience.

 

Who is it for

 

- Someone who wants a vehicle with a high ground clearance to tackle bad roads.

- Someone who wants an SUV that visually stands out from the pack.

 

 

 

 

What I learned from driving the Mazda CX-5

 

- Multimedia unit - This is by far one of the easiest and most fun multimedia units to use. There is a rotary knob behind the gear lever which functions as a direction and action button to carry out commands on the display unit.

On another note, without using the manual booklet, I was able to sync my phone via Bluetooth within seconds. What's even better was the fact that my contacts, songs, and emails were immediately accessibly on the multimedia screen.

- Simplicity and sound - The dials and centre-console buttons are all arranged in such a very simple manner, I felt like Mazda did some research and used only what was needed. Buttons are few and designated to do straightforward tasks. The vehicle is also equipped with a seven-speaker Bose system that sounds excellent from the get-go - no tweaking necessary.

- Skyactive - Mazda has been making a lot of noise about its Skyactive technology, which is expected to create a synergy of fuel efficiency, low gas emission and performance. However, the two-litre engine performance was average. Maybe it was my expectation but there wasn't a 'wow' factor.

If you want to save gas you can put it in the normal mode. However, if you plan on doing some serious overtaking, you are definitely going to have to put it in sport mode.

- Height - The vehicle has a high ground clearance for its class, which is great for hilly terrains. It also means that you might have to go a little slower around corners than intended.

In addition, the ride was very comfortable for the most part. However, I found the leather seats to be on the firm side.

 

Features

 

- Camera: It comes equipped with a rear camera. Unfortunately, there are no proximity sensors to beep when you are too close to an object.

When reversing, you will have to rely on the red line on the monitor, which usually means you are within a foot of the object.

- Safety: It uses a digital parking-brake switch, located behind the gear lever, at the lower right side. A cool function is that it cannot be deactivated if the door is opened.

- Dual-climate air condition - Each front seat passenger can adjust the A/C temperature to his or her liking, using separate designated knobs to do so. However, the wind intensity is standard for all vents. In future, I would love if Mazda considers rear A/C vents for back-seat passengers.

- I-Stop - Mazda boasts that its I-Stop technology can improve fuel efficiency by five per cent. Once it is activated, ensure you press down on the brake thoroughly. This will shut the engine off and when your foot is removed from the brake pedal the engine will immediately start. It must be noted that you cannot activate this feature in sport mode.

Cost to full gas tank: $7, 632 (90 Octane @ $137*)

Fuel usage on average: 5.5 km/ 1L

Gas tank size: 56L

Tested Model: 2.0L high spec w/leather interior

Basic specs: 2wd

Price: High spec: $5 million*

Low spec with standard interior: $4.7 million

Competition: Honda CRV, Toyota Rav4, Nissan Trail, Mitsubishi ASX

You can check the video online at our website, jamaica-gleaner.com, or our JamaicaGleaner page on YouTube.

Vehicle provided courtesy of Executive Motors Ltd. Telpehone 929-5274.

For comments and suggestions, email yl.jamaica@gmail.com

*Data as at July 2015