Tue | Sep 26, 2017

NWC explains continued low water levels at Mona Reservoir

Published:Tuesday | October 6, 2015 | 10:27 AM
Communications manager at the NWC, Charles Buchanan says a major part of the supply for the Mona Reservoir are the Hope River in St Andrew and the Yallahs and Negril rivers in St Thomas and St Thomas is still reeling from the impacts of the drought.

The National Water Commission (NWC) has given an explanation for the continued low water levels at the Mona Reservoir despite huge improvements at other catchment facilities.

Yesterday the NWC said following the weekend rains the storage level at the Hermitage Dam moved from 69 per cent to 100 per cent.

However, it said the Mona Reservoir had only climbed to 36 per cent from 25 per cent.

Communications manager at the NWC, Charles Buchanan, explains that the Hermitage Dam is a smaller facility and is half the size of the Mona Reservoir.

He notes that it holds 393 million gallons while the Mona Reservoir holds 809, which means it will take consistent rainfall to fill the reservoir.

In addition, Buchanan says a major part of the supply for the Mona Reservoir are the Hope River in St Andrew and the Yallahs and Negril rivers in St Thomas and St Thomas is still reeling from the impacts of the drought.

At the worst stage of the drought storage levels had dropped to as low as about 20 per cent at the Mona Reservoir and 25 at the Hermitage Dam.

Meanwhile, the NWC says the weekend’s rainfall has allowed it to relax some of the restrictions on water supply.

It says all drought-related restrictions are being lifted for customers served by the Seaview and Hermitage/Constant Spring water supply systems.

It also says those served by the Mona and Hope supply systems will now have water for 10 to 12 hours daily, but nightly restrictions will remain.