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West Kingston Enquiry: Diary of a slain gangster to be read into evidence

Published:Friday | October 30, 2015 | 10:19 AMLivern Barrett, Gleaner Writer

The West Kingston Commission of Enquiry has agreed to hear contents of a diary taken from a slain gangster, which attorneys say indicate that he was among the armed thugs who waged a fierce firefight with the security forces during the May 2010 operation in Tivoli Gardens.

The diary was reportedly taken from Cedric Murray, more popularly known as 'Doggie', who was killed in a shoot-out with the police in Clarendon on August 12, 2010.

The decision to hear the contents came after attorneys for the Office of the Public Defender raised objections that they were nothing more than "gossip chat."

But attorney for the Jamaica Defence Force (JDF) Linton Gordon disagreed, arguing that Murray's writings indicate that he was in Tivoli Gardens.

"He speaks of 'war' and 'worse than we expected'... he was there," Gordon insisted, reading from the diary.

Commission chairman Sir David Simmons then ruled that the documents would be highly relevant to the way his panel is going to write their report.

The West Kingston Commission of Enquiry has agreed to hear contents of a diary taken from a slain gangster, which attorneys say indicate that he was among the armed thugs who waged a fierce firefight with the security forces during the May 2010 operation in Tivoli Gardens.

The diary was reportedly taken from Cedric Murray, more popularly known as 'Doggie', who was killed in a shoot-out with the police in Clarendon on August 12, 2010.

The decision to hear the contents came after attorneys for the Office of the Public Defender raised objections that they were nothing more than "gossip chat".

But attorney for the Jamaica Defence Force Linton Gordon disagreed, arguing that Murray's writings indicate that he was in Tivoli Gardens.

"He speaks of 'war' and 'worse than we expected' ... he was there," Gordon insisted, reading from the diary.

Commission chairman Sir David Simmons then ruled that the documents would be highly relevant to the way his panel is going to write their report.