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'Articulate minority' should put down smartphones and vote, says Holness

Published:Friday | November 6, 2015 | 10:15 AM
Andrew Holness warned apathetic voters not to give the ruling People’s National Party any inkling that they might not vote, saying this will lead members of the government to believe they are not accountable to anyone.

Leader of the Jamaica Labour Party, Andrew Holness, has challenged members of the so called ‘articulate minority’ to move from behind their computers, put down their smartphones and make their voices heard with their votes in upcoming general elections.

He was speaking during the latest in the party’s Prosperity Live Series of meetings which was held in Morant Bay, St Thomas, last night.

JLP Leader Andrew Holness greets supporters in St Thomas during a 'Poverty to Prosperity' session in Morant Bay.

JLP Leader Andrew Holness greets supporters in St Thomas during a 'Poverty to Prosperity' session in Morant Bay.

Holness warned apathetic voters not to give the ruling People’s National Party any inkling that they might not vote, saying this will lead members of the government to believe they are not accountable to anyone.

The opposition leader said although many Jamaicans believe voting will not make a difference in how the country is run, staying away from the polls could lead to things getting worse.

 

Leader of the Jamaica Labour Party, Andrew Holness.

A Gleaner-commissioned Bill Johnson poll conducted in late September showed that many Jamaicans believe it doesn’t make much difference whether the JLP or the PNP forms the next Government.

READ: Who cares? - Many Jamaicans believe it doesn't make much difference whether the JLP or the PNP governs the country at this time

The poll found that 48 per cent of Jamaicans were not convinced that voting for either of the parties would make a difference and the pollster said many of them would not vote since they already see it as a lost cause.

However, Holness argued last night that with apathetic voters being among the most educated, when they do not vote, others who are less inclined to hold the government accountable are allowed to make decisions for them.

 

Leader of the Jamaica Labour Party, Andrew Holness.