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Caribbean Maritime Institute accused of employing unqualified and inexperienced educators

Published:Tuesday | January 19, 2016 | 1:14 AMJovan Johnson, Gleaner Writer
Over a five-year period, 2010 to 2015, Caribbean Maritime Institute's enrollment increased by 105 per cent, moving from 1,090 students to 2,236 students.

The Caribbean Maritime Institute (CMI) is being accused of employing unqualified and inexperienced people to teach its students and breaching international guidelines.

Auditor General Pamela Munroe Ellis made the disclosure in a report on an activity-based audit, tabled recently in the House of Representatives.

Her findings come as the CMI tries to position itself as the leading organisation to train Jamaicans to benefit from and push Jamaica's logistics hub efforts. 

Munroe Ellis said the CMI's decision to employ inexperienced assistant lecturers breached the international maritime guidelines and raise questions about the standard and quality of the institute’s programme delivery.

She alleged that six assistant lecturers who were employed did not possess the requisite three-year teaching experience or formal training. 

She also flagged the CMI for employing 253 part-time lecturers at a cost of $135.6 million without approval from the Finance Ministry. 

The report said a review of CMI’s annual student surveys highlighted concerns about training offered by lecturers.

Meanwhile, the Auditor General says the situation was made worse as the CMI increased its intake of students without auditing its resources to see whether it could meet the needs of the increased student population. 

Over the five-year period, 2010 to 2015, CMI's enrollment increased by 105 per cent, moving from 1,090 students to 2,236 students.

The auditor general says the CMI risks extending its resources, potential reputational damage and breaching the International Maritime Organization standards of operation.