Thu | Oct 19, 2017

Anthony Hylton calls Edward Seaga an armchair politician

Published:Tuesday | February 2, 2016 | 7:54 PMJovan Johnson, Gleaner Writer
Hylton: Mr Seaga has the luxury of armchair politician for the moment and that's a good position to be after a long and successful career.

Deputy chairman of the People's National Party (PNP) Anthony Hylton, has labelled Edward Seaga an 'armchair politician' after the retired MP asserted that the Jamaica Labour Party (JLP) would have 'wiped out' the PNP if the elections were held last year.

An armchair politician is understood to mean someone who has poorly based opinions and defends them with little evidence.

Hylton in an interview with The Gleaner/Power 106 News Centre argued that Seaga's comments cannot be taken seriously.

According to the West St Andrew Member of Parliament, the PNP was going through "issues" that would have prevented any smart politician from announcing an election date between November and December last year.

READ: Seaga says JLP would have wiped out PNP if election was called last year

"The truth is, there were specific issues ...Who calls an election when you have specific issues that your challenged by? Who does that? Is that smart politics?" Hylton asked.

He added: "He (Seaga) wouldn't have done that if he were in the position that Portia Simpson Miller now occupies. Mr Seaga has the luxury of armchair politician for the moment and that's a good position to be after a long and successful career."

It was widely believed that PNP president, Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller would have called the elections by December, but things changed as the government grappled with the fallout out from its internal candidate selections and a string of national scandals.

Speaking on Cliff Hughes Online on Power 106FM this morning, Seaga said in November, the JLP was leading the PNP by a two percent margin was destined to grow.

However, Seaga said the apparent delay in the election announcement affected the party's funding and its efforts to maintain the lead in what he calls vulnerable constituencies.

Jamaicans are to go to the polls in a general election on February 25.