Sat | Oct 21, 2017

How Intel is approaching wearable tech

Published:Monday | February 29, 2016 | 12:00 AM
Ayse Ildeniz, vice president of Intel's New Devices Group, wears a Tag Heuer smartwatch, one of the devices Intel is helping to engineer. The new devices group is finding ways to add technology to all sorts of things, from brassieres to cars.
Ayse Ildeniz, vice president of Intel's New Devices Group, wears a MICA smart bracelet by Opening Ceremony, one of the devices Intel is helping to engineer. The new devices group is finding ways to add technology to all sorts of things, from brassieres to cars.
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The fast-growing field of "wearables" apparel and accessories that contain some sort of connected technology is forcing chipmakers to find common ground with the fashion world.

It's a learning process, according to Ayse Ildeniz, who is vice-president and general manager for business development and strategy with Intel's New Devices Group. Engineers have had to learn about fashion and clothes, and accessory designers have had to learn about technology.

But the collaboration already has produced the button-sized Curie module, based on an energy-efficient Intel chip called the Quark, which can be programmed to take on a multitude of tasks for the burgeoning Internet of Things.

Q: You have spoken a lot about the role of technology in women's lives. What are the main issues that you see as a woman in technology?

A: I think we need to make sure, when we're providing technology, that we cater to the needs of different segments of the market. Women are very, very important as far as wearables are concerned. Women do care hugely about what they wear and what they put on themselves. We need to make sure as technologists that we provide cool usage models. Aesthetics is important.

Q: How would you go about it?

A: The way we decided to go about it is through partnerships. Instead of ourselves sitting in a lab insularly, to go out and talk to people who have been making these things for years. Two years ago, when we kicked off the New Devices Group, we went after Luxottica, Fossil 15 brands in all. We went out and partnered with (the Council of) Fashion Designers of America. We got together with these people and we picked their brains as to what do they think women would wear.

Q: An example?

A: We came out with a smart bracelet, MICA an Opening Ceremony brand which is sold at Barneys instead of at a tech store. The bracelet has been overwhelmingly loved by women because of its aesthetics.

Q: Since then, you have done a dress and a sports bra with a cutting-edge fashion house, Chromat. How did that go?

A: They (Chromat) understand tech very well. They've done 3-D printing and LED light stuff. They understand material. This dress, or the carbon fibre in back of the dress, takes a shape like an hourglass when the wearer's adrenaline gets high.

Q: What about the sports bra?

A: I can't tell you the why. I can tell you the what and how. Our Curie module, which is so small, came out of our partnership with the fashion world, which told us, "Everything you guys are doing is great, it's just too big". So we went back and did this little button-like thing with sensors for perspiration and body temperature. If it gets too warm and you're perspiring, it opens little vents (to) help the body breathe a little better.

Q: What else is coming?

A: By 2020 and 2025, there are going be 50 billion connected things which we call the Internet of Things, and we are trying to make that a reality. Everything in the world, from the lamp to the desktop you're using, to the shirt you're wearing, will have some kind of intelligence. Only then can the 'Internet of Things' dream become a reality. Intel is invested in making this happen. You're going see many more things.

- TNS