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DPP questions credibility of US report on Jamaica's prosecution of corruption cases

Published:Monday | March 7, 2016 | 3:59 AM
Director of Public Prosecutions Paula Llewellyn says the US report does not take into consideration the overburdened court system and resource deficiencies that have affected the system.

The Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) Paula Llewellyn says the absence of statistics to support certain claims in the United States' (US) 2016 International Narcotics Control Strategy Report released recently raises questions of credibility.

The DPP argues that without the supporting data it is insufficient to make the claim that Jamaica's judiciary has a poor record of successfully prosecuting corruption cases against high-level law enforcement and government officials. 

 

DPP Paula Llewllyn

Meanwhile, the DPP says the US report does not take into consideration the overburdened court system and resource deficiencies that have affected the system. 

READ: US flogs Jamaica's judiciary over anti-corruption record

The government has accepted that there is need for more courtroom spaces, judges and prosecutors, among other resources.

Llewellyn is asserting that prosecutors cannot make up cases and the presumption of innocence must always be upheld. 

She says the system depends heavily on complaints despite reports of high level of corruption in public life. 

 

DPP Paula Llewllyn

Most corruption cases are prosecuted in the Resident Magistrate's Court by Clerks of Court who report to the Chief Justice Zaila McCalla.

In 2014, the Organisation of American States released a report, blasting Jamaica's prosecutorial agencies, especially the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions, for what it called a general failure to prosecute corruption cases.