Fri | Aug 18, 2017

Lessons From Corporate Dads

Published:Friday | June 17, 2016 | 6:00 AM
Richard Byles and sons Yannick Byles (left) and Pavel Byles.
Ricardo Nuncio shares a special moment with his son, Mateo, as he welcomes his baby sister, Valeria, with a gentle kiss.
Shopping trip with Dad: GraceKennedy Group CEO Don Wehby enjoys a shopping trip with daughters Abigail (left) and Stephanie.
Courtney Campbell, president and CEO of Victoria Mutual Building Society, with his father, Osmond Campbell (left).
Calvin and daughter Juliet Lyn Chuck.
David Butler and his dad.
R. Danny Williams (centre) and wife, Shirley Williams (to his right), with their extended clan.
John O. Minott and his daughters, Kelsey (left) and Danielle.
Kevin O’Brien Chang (centre), his mother, Angela Chang, and father Bobby.
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As we approach Father's Day, we asked some of Jamaica's corporate executives what they learnt from their fathers that they are now passing on to their children.

R. Danny Williams, chairman, Sagicor Group

"I learnt from my father that love and unconditional support, no matter what the circumstances, was the best thing you can give your children. I have tried to pass this on to my children."

Richard Byles, president and CEO, Sagicor Group

"It was very important for my dad that I had a good education, an opportunity he didn't have. He taught me that a good education opened doors and was the key to opportunities. Never stop learning because life never stops teaching, he said. This advice I ensured was imparted to my sons."

Kevin O'Brien Chang, managing director, Fontana Pharmacy

"The three most important things are family, respect and love. Family is love and respect. Love and respect is family. That is what my father taught me and what I hope to pass on to my family."

Don Wehby, CEO, GraceKennedy Group

"My father taught me: Don't be impressed by money and title. Be impressed by humility, integrity, kindness and hard work. He also instilled in me the phrase: 'Ad majorem Dei gloriam' - For the greater glory of God ... and that family is the most important institution in life, but most importantly, never give up."

Courtney Campbell, CEO, Victoria Mutual Building Society Group

"I have learnt and passed on traditional values, our faith, love of family and the joy of serving people. My father also introduced me to the game of cricket, which my sons also love."

Ricardo Nuncio, managing director, Red Stripe Jamaica

"The number one rule in life is to be happy, no matter what you do it is important that you enjoy it. Learn to value and cherish the simple things that give the biggest joy."

Calvin Lyn, Lyn's Funeral Home Ltd

"My maternal grandmother (my father figure) taught me that I should not steal, be ambitious, prepare to work hard, be satisfied with what I have. Similarly, this I have passed on to my daughter and grandchildren, in addition to having respect for others, and to be upright citizens."

David Butler, CEO, Digicel Jamaica

"My dad taught me the importance of being disciplined, caring, supportive and firm. His guidance played an important role in my life, as did the stable foundation. Much of my passion and drive stems from the invaluable life lessons Dad taught me.

"My dad stressed that the best way to tell people what to do is by leading consistently with your own actions.

"The first and most important lesson to my children is learning to say 'please' and 'thank you'. Good manners and treating others with respect are very important to their overall upbringing. So, too, teaching them the value of always being truthful, be courteous, and equally important, take responsibility for their actions."

John O. Minott, general manager, Jamaica Standard Products

"There are two things my father passed on to me that I have tried to pass on to my children. My father, John (Jackie) Minott, taught me the importance of being mannerly and polite, especially towards women and the elderly.

"He also taught me the value of work - hard work. As young children, we had to go down to the office at Williamsfield to work during the school holidays.

"I believe my children have learnt well."