Sun | Aug 20, 2017

It's a good result for all the hard work

Published:Thursday | June 23, 2016 | 6:09 AMChristoher Thomas
Gerald Winkler (back row, left), principal of the Montego Bay Christian Academy, and Carissa Perry (back row, right), the school's grade six teacher, with their highest-performing GSAT students. Seated from left: Paula-Marie Brown, who achieved a 99 per cent average; Teri-Lee Stubbs, 98.4 per cent; Juannica Fennel, 97.8 per cent; Trent McPherson, 97.4 per cent; and Jayda Woolery, 96.6 per cent.

WESTERN BUREAU:

The Montego Bay Christian Academy has distinguished itself in this year's Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) with five of its students gaining averages in the high 90s. The five top performers are Paula-Marie Brown, with an average of 99 per cent; Teri-Lee Stubbs, 98.4 per cent; Juannica Fennel, 97.8 per cent; Trent McPherson, 97.4 per cent; and Jayda Woolery, 96.6 per cent.

"I feel very proud of myself, because I worked hard for the exam," said Paula-Marie, who will attend Mount Alvernia High School. She aspires to become a dental surgeon or paediatrician.

Teri-Lee, Juannica and Jayda are all heading to Montego Bay High School, their school of choice, while Trent will be attending Herbert Morrison Technical High School. Teri-Lee wishes to become a paediatrician; Juannica, an accountant; Trent, a scientist and a footballer; and Jayda, a paediatric surgeon.

Principal Gerald Winkler showered the top five students, and the entire grade-six class by

extension, with congratulations for their performance.

"They did excellently this year, and we are so proud of them," said Winkler. "Overall, the whole class earned a 92 per cent average in mathematics; 92 per cent in language arts; 90 per cent in science and social studies; and 11 out of 12 for communication tasks."

"Our motto is 'Achieving Excellence Through Christ.' We also believe in being well rounded, so it's not always just GSAT, there are also sports, community outreach, and extracurricular activities, and we encourage the students to be involved so that when they leave here, they will be well rounded," Winkler added Grade-six teacher Carissa Perry also had words of high praise for her students, though she admitted the work of preparation was often difficult.

"I am extremely proud of my students, and I think they did very well. They worked hard, and the results paid off," said Perry. "It was challenging at times because we have students with various learning styles, but we tried to teach them according to their different learning styles. We did a lot of revision and sometimes we were here on Saturdays. It was good results for all the hard work."