Mon | Sep 25, 2017

CDA provides counseling for Nevalesia Campbell's sibling

Published:Monday | July 18, 2016 | 7:00 AM

The Child Development Agency's (CDA) team of first responders conducted an assessment of the brother of Nevalesia Campbell, through play therapy session, which revealed he is suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and will need further counselling.

The mutilated body of three year-old Nevalesia Campbell was found in bushes in Orange Hill, St Ann, on Sunday, July 10.

Minister of state in the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information, Floyd Green, lauded the police for moving swiftly in their search for the deceased as well as in apprehending the suspect of the gruesome act.

"I urge all Jamaicans to join hands and confront these perpetrators, with the aim of crippling their merciless and nefarious activities everywhere they exist. And parents, we must ensure that our children are under supervision, children of this age are never to be left alone," he added.

As it relates to the well-being of the sibling, the matter was brought before the court and he is deemed to be in need of care and protection.

Based on the nature under which Nevalesia was killed, the CDA reminds parents and guardians of their role as caregivers to children. Under the Child Care and Protection Act (CCPA), parents have the main responsibility for the care and protection of children.

 

CHILD NEGLECT

 

Parental duties apply to both mother and father, whether or not they live with the child, and guardians or other persons charged with the raising of the child.

Child neglect can result in a maximum sentence of three years. Failing to report if you know or suspect that a child is abused or is in need of care and protection can result in sentence of six months in prison or a fine of $500,000.

The CDA is partnering with other stakeholders to visit the community tomorrow to offer additional support and conduct sensitisation sessions with community members about the effects of child abuse and the dangers of leaving children unsupervised.