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A number of things went wrong ... PNP to review election rejection

Published:Monday | November 28, 2016 | 11:04 PM
Opposition Leader and PNP president Portia Simpson Miller

Jovan Johnson, Staff Reporter

The leadership of the People's National Party (PNP) will be meeting in short order to again scrutinise itself as the 78-year-old party tries to come to grips with its second electoral rejection in nine months, vice president, Dr Wykeham McNeill has suggested.

The party went into today's local government elections with control of all 14 local government authorities.

That was wiped out tonight, however, as latest results show the Jamaica Labour Party (JLP) winning eight of the municipal corporations to the PNP's three.

In addition the PNP has retained the Portmore municipality.

There is a tie in both St Thomas and St Catherine.

McNeill speaking with Damion Mitchell on Power 106FM Monday evening said the results point to "a number of things" that went wrong.

Questioned on what the results mean for Simpson Miller, the PNP vice president was cautious.


IN PHOTO: Jubilant JLP supporters 

"The top brass of the party will be meeting to look at all the elements of what caused us to have this loss and how we are going to go forward. There are some points that are more relevant than others but you have to take things in a wide context," he added.

At the same time, McNeill said generally, the party that loses the general election, loses the local elections.

In a Gleaner article today, political historian, Troy Caine said while a bad result could be devastating for Simpson Miller's continued leadership, he was not certain she would be affected.

READ: Portia On 'Trial' 

"I don't know what it will take to uproot Mrs Simpson Miller. She does not seem to be affected by the worst of things that has happened to either her or the party," he added

Political commentator Kevin O'Brien Chang, argued that Simpson Miller was on 'trial' today and a bad result would resurrect calls for her to step down.

"A big loss would damage Mrs Simpson Miller because a lot of people are already saying she's 70, she should go. And if she loses the elections badly, people will say, 'Well, you've lost four of the six elections you've run'."