Fri | Dec 14, 2018

PSOJ wants police commissioner to break 'silence' on 'death squad' conviction

Published:Tuesday | November 20, 2018 | 2:49 PM
PSOJ President, Howard Mitchell - File photo

The Howard Mitchell-led Private Sector Organisation of Jamaica (PSOJ) is taking Commissioner of Police Major General Antony Anderson to task over his silence on the conviction of Constable Collis 'Chucky' Brown who was found guilty of murders committed as part of a police 'death squad' in Clarendon.

Brown was convicted last week Thursday for the murders of three men in two separate incidents in Clarendon.

READ: 'Chucky' Brown found guilty

The policeman was also found guilty of conspiracy to commit murder and wounding with intent.

Evidence was admitted during the trial in the Home Circuit Court in which Brown disclosed, among other things, that the police 'death squad' was supplied with resources target criminals and that the 'unit' had the support of senior members of the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF).

The PSOJ, in a statement this afternoon, argued that "the allegations of police teams systematically acting on the instructions of senior police officers to target and kill individuals have the gravest consequences for the public’s trust and confidence in the JCF as well as highlighting large-scale human rights abuses."

"The PSOJ would invite the Commissioner of Police to reassure the citizens of Jamaica that this unlawful practice has ceased,” the association added.

“We strongly urge the Commissioner of Police to make a statement," it emphasised.

Full Statement

 

On 15th November 2018, at the Supreme Court, Police Constable Collis ‘Chucky’ Brown was found guilty of:

1) Murder of Damoy Gutty Dawkins on January 10, 2009

2) Murder of Dwayne Douglas on December 13, 2012

3) Murder of Andrew Fearon on December 13, 2012

4) Wounding with intent of a Crown witness on January 10, 2009

5) Conspiracy to commit murder

This matter related to Brown’s admissions that with other police officers, he was part of an operational team that targeted and killed known criminals in the Clarendon area. The evidence presented asserted that this practice occurred with the knowledge and support of senior officers from the Jamaica Constabulary Force.

The PSOJ accepts that the JCF High Command must be minded not to prejudice similar criminal trials concerning other police officers which will commence imminently, but we are concerned that there has been no public comment by the Commissioner of Police.

The trial of Collis Brown was a matter of great public interest. The allegations of police teams systematically acting on the instructions of senior police officers to target and kill individuals have the gravest consequences for the public’s trust and confidence in the JCF as well as highlighting large-scale human rights abuses.

The PSOJ would invite the Commissioner of Police to reassure the citizens of Jamaica that this unlawful practice has ceased.

What measures have been put in place to ensure that it never happens again? And what internal measures have been taken to investigate the evidence from Brown’s trial to identify and investigate any serving police officers or those who may have since left the service. The people of Jamaica are entitled to a police service that they can have confidence in to act within the law. We strongly urge the Commissioner of Police to make a statement.

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