Sat | Mar 28, 2020

Earth Today | Jamaica pursues technology needs assessments

Published:Thursday | March 26, 2020 | 12:19 AM
Caribbean islands remain vulnerable to climate change impacts, despite COVID-19. Here, men play dominoes in the middle of a flooded street as others pull broken furniture from calf-high water in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma, in Havana, Cuba in September 2017.
Caribbean islands remain vulnerable to climate change impacts, despite COVID-19. Here, men play dominoes in the middle of a flooded street as others pull broken furniture from calf-high water in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma, in Havana, Cuba in September 2017.

JAMAICA IS now more engaged in work to create technology projects for climate-change resilience building.

A team – comprised of the Climate Change Division together with representatives from The University of the West Indies, the United Nations Environment Programme, and the Technology University of Denmark – is undertaking technology needs assessments (TNAs) for the island.

TNAs are a set of country-driven activities that identify adaptation and mitigation technology priorities for developing countries. They also track evolving needs for new equipment, techniques, practical knowledge and skills to mitigate greenhouse gases (GHGs) and adapt to adverse impacts of climate change.

Further, TNAs are intended to help developing countries to identify priority technological needs that can form the basis of environmentally sound technology projects and programmes.

Now several months into the Global Environment Facility-funded work in Jamaica, Eleanor Jones, one of the independent consultants on the project, said their efforts are invaluable.

“It is helping us to build the base for accessing funds to help us to build our climate resilience, which is both adaptation and mitigation. And Jamaica should be proud that we were able to garner the readiness funds to do so,” she said.

“Now we are doing the barrier assessment. Once that is done, we will go into the action plan and from there, develop concept papers that can go for funding,” explained Jones, who is marshalling the work on adaptation.

The goal is to have those submitted for consideration for financing by, among other entities, the Green Climate Fund (CGF), which was set up by 194 governments to limit or reduce GHG emissions in developing countries.

The CGF also supports adaptation to the unavoidable impacts of climate change in vulnerable societies.

Climate-change impacts include global warming and sea level rise, with implications for compromised food and water security; as well as extreme weather events, with implications for public health.

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