Wed | Aug 12, 2020

Lennon High implements strategies for new school year

Published:Friday | July 31, 2020 | 12:25 AMCecelia Campbell Livingston/Gleaner Writer
Principal of Lennon High School, Clarendon Frederick Lattray, speaks about the changes he plans to implement when the new school year starts in September 2020.
Principal of Lennon High School, Clarendon Frederick Lattray, speaks about the changes he plans to implement when the new school year starts in September 2020.

Frederick Lattray, principal of Lennon High School in Clarendon, has said that he has begun implementing strategies to ensure that the plant is ready to accommodate students come September.

Lattray told The Gleaner that prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, the classrooms comfortably accommodated roughly 30 students. However, come September, he will have to find creative ways to deal with the lack of space.

“We are going to be splitting the school in half from first form to fifth form, with one group coming in on the eight-to 11 shift while the other group comes in from 12 to three,” he said.

According Lattray, it will not necessitate getting additional teachers as school normally runs from 8 a.m. until 3 p.m..

Lattray said that a blended approach would also be taken as some of the lessons would be accessed online.

However, before he can sign off on that format, a survey is being conducted with parents to determine how many students have access to data, Wi-Fi, and smart devices.

“Coming out of the analysis of that information, we will be collecting, then we decide to what extent we design the approach taken with the online classes,” he shared.

MISSED OPPORTUNITY

With school closed since early March, some primary-school students who had data challenges as well as other issues did not have an opportunity to participate in online learning. Lattray said that he has already started processing the 172 students that were placed at his school.

“We are currently in the process of doing our diagnostic testing in order to organise our data, which we will be using to determine how we will approach the students.”

He said that lessons would be structured to respond to the deficiencies identified in the students who are diagnosed.

Lattray said that the students have been coming in to the school in name sequence and are being diagnosed in numeracy and literacy.

In an effort to get students to start working on their school-based assessment, Lattray said that students have been visiting the school to have one-on-one sessions.