Tue | Apr 25, 2017

Mathematical formula for great teamwork: Pt II

Published:Sunday | August 16, 2015 | 8:00 AM

This week, we continue by using the BOMDAS formula to strengthen our relationships in teams.

 

Problem: 7 + (6 + 3) x 5 -4 / 2

 

Step 1: Work out what is in the brackets first: 7+ 9 x 5 - 4 / 2

Step 2: Then do the multiplication and division: 7 +45 - 2

Step 3: Then do the addition: 52 - 2

Step 4: And finally the subtraction: 50

Answer: 50

A sense of belonging is essential if the team is to achieve high levels of success - in our homes, in our workplaces, and in any group.

Groups experience different levels of bonding, unity or team spirit - what I call cohesiveness. Yet, cohesiveness plays such a critical role in the life they experience.

History is replete with records of sports teams that triumphed primarily on the basis of their cohesiveness, while the loser's column is filled with those who were caught up in on-and-of-the-field strife and disunity.

Why is cohesiveness - bonding, unity, and team spirit so important? The oft-used Together Each Achieves More applies. Group work is more effective than independent individual effort.

It is useful to examine what a team is and why they add value.

My preferred definition is:

A team is a small number of people with complementary skills, who are committed to a common purpose, set of performance goals and approaches for which they hold themselves mutually accountable.

What can we learn from this definition?

1. People with complementary skills

Teamwork incorporating team cohesiveness does NOT mean that everybody has to be the same. Successful teams need people to bring different talents, perspectives and ideas to the table. One sign of a successful team is the fact that it helps its members to achieve self-fulfilment. Team leaders must empower team members.

2. People who are committed to a common purpose

The glue that holds the team together is the commitment to the common purpose. Without the commitment to the common purpose, the team loses its compass.

Without the commitment to the common purpose, members do not have any point of reference that can hold them together. It is like using rubber bands to tie a team of wild horses together.

Commitment has two distinct and critically important components:

• There must be a clearly identified purpose that is understood in the same way by all the members of the team.

• The second component is that all the members of a functional team commit to the same understanding of the common purpose. One indelible sign of a dysfunctional team is the fact that some members are wavering in their commitment to the common purpose.

3. People who are committed to a set of performance goals and approaches

• Successful teams know where they are going. They also know how they are going to get there. In addition, they know if they are on track.

• Successful teams are clear on the strategies and the activities that will lead them to the achievement of the common purpose.

• Successful teams have guidelines and yardsticks that indicate to them whether they are on course or not.

• Successful teams do not lose bearing and lose momentum, because they have set performance goals that keep them on track.

In successful teams, members:

• Know and commit to the performance goals. They understand that the guidelines and yardsticks are tied to the attainment of the common purpose.

• Understand and buy into an agreed approach that is tied to performance goals that lead to attainment of the common purpose.

• Do not come up with their own approaches and guidelines as they deem fit.

This issue of the importance of commitment to the team and its values is not widely understood and accepted. That is why there is so much conflict and lack of cohesiveness in households, work groups, organisations, communities and the wider society.

4. Team members must be mutually accountable

Without accountability, things fall apart. Great teams accept the need for discipline, and team members are open to receiving feedback.

Leadership has a critical role in addressing these issues. The upcoming SHRM-accredited 3-D Leader Certification deals directly with those challenges, among others.

• Trevor E. S. Smith is a behaviour-modification coach with the Success with People Academy, which is recognised by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) to offer Professional Development Credits (PDCs) for the SHRM-CPSM or SHRM-SCPSM certifications. Joint venture partner Extended DISC/FinxS Caribbean. Website: http://swpacademy.com