Tue | Aug 22, 2017

Dear Doc | Can my wife take my viagra?

Published:Sunday | September 11, 2016 | 9:00 AM

Q My wife wants to take my Viagra, Doc! This is because she feel she isn't getting enough satisfaction in bed.

Would it help?

A: Alas, no! Scientists have extensively tested Viagra on women, and all that it seems to do is to increase vaginal lubrication a little.

You and your wife should go and see an experienced counsellor or doctor, in order to discuss ways in which you could give her a better time in bed. Good luck.

 

Scared of Pill-induced clotting

 

Q Hi, Doc. I am a sexually active 33-year-old woman. When I say sexually active, I mean it!

Up until now, I have been relying on my partners to use condoms, but sometimes things go wrong. Last month, I had one split on me.

So I have decided that it would be a good idea to try the Pill. I am aware that there are some risks associated with using it over the age of 30. My aunt had a very bad clot in her leg while on the pill, so I don't want that to happen to me!

Therefore, I would like to know what you would advise in choosing a Pill. Could I get one that has very low risk of clotting?

A A good question. The risk of clotting (thrombosis) on the Pill is not very high, but it does increase as you get into your 30s. Other factors which increase the risk are smoking, obesity, diabetes, and a family history of clotting.

Mind you, I would not say that your family history sounds very bad. The fact that your aunt had a clot in her leg may have been just poor luck. But I feel you should check with your own doctor, just to make sure that you don't have any familial condition that causes clotting.

Now, every woman over the age of 30 who is considering the pill, should read what I am about to say - even though it is a little complicated!

It is vital to go on a brand of pill which carries a low risk of causing thrombosis. Unfortunately, some brands carry a higher risk than others.

All pills contains two types of hormone:

• Oestrogen (pronounced 'ees - tro -jen');

• And Progestogen (in American lingo, a 'progestin')

There are many different oestrogens and progestogens. As far as the oestrogen is concerned, you should only take a pill that contains the lowest possible dose. For instance, one which contains just 20mg of oestrogen called 'ethynyl oestradiol' is likely to be very safe.

As it relates to the Progestrogen, the important thing to grasp is that several fairly recently-introduced progestogens do now seem to carry a higher risk of causing clots in the veins. These include ones which are called 'desogestrel' and 'gestodene.'

In my view, every woman who wants to take the pill, should discuss the ingredients carefully with her doctor. Do not go on the Pill unless you are sure that the chosen brand is a low-risk one. That is particularly important for women over the age of 30.

 

Should I confess to my wife?

 

Q Doc, five years ago, I cheated on my wife, with a woman in England - where I was working at the time. I have been feeling very guilty since then.

I would like to get this 'off my chest.' It is a burden to me, Doc. I think of it every day.

So, please tell me. Should I confess it all to my wife?

A Please do not do this. Time and time again, I have seen men and women who were burdened by guilt about affairs decide to 'confess all' to their partners.

Sometimes this big confession worked out OK. But much more often, the result was that the partner was devastated.

I saw one case in which a man decided to tell his wife that he had cheated on her the previous year. As a result, the normally cheerful woman became very depressed, contemplated suicide, and eventually divorced her husband.

At the moment, I presume your wife is happy, especially if she has no idea that you cheated. Why shatter her happiness?

I appreciate that you have a big burden of guilt, and that you wish to try and get rid of it by confessing what you did. But what you should do is to confess it in all confidence to some independent, wise and trustworthy person. The obvious candidate would be a minister of religion.

 

Have I caught a VD?

 

Q Hi, Doc. I had sex with a young policeman in Montego Bay a month ago, and now I have a white vaginal discharge. It itches very badly - it is driving me crazy!

Do you think this is a VD?

A That's unlikely, though, I do feel that you should have a check-up from a doctor. The usual cause of a white, itchy discharge is yeast. Also known as 'thrush' or 'candida,' this is an extremely common fungus infection.

Unfortunately, the little fungus just loves warm, moist places - which is why it tends to 'home in' on women's vaginas. (Another of its favourite targets is in babies' mouths.)

The usual treatment is with an anti-fungus drug called 'clotrimazole' (also known as 'Canesten'). This comes in the form of pessaries (that is, vaginal tablets) and vaginal cream.

If the woman is in a regular relationship, it's often a good idea to treat her partner as well. Generally, he should put the clotrimazole cream on his penis twice a day for a week.

Another approach is to take an oral capsule called 'fluconazole' (also called 'Diflucan'). Note: this should not be taken during pregnancy or breast-feeding.

Be guided by your doctor as to how to banish this irritating fungus.

 

Should I douche?

 

Q My mother keeps telling me that I should do regular vaginal douching, Doc. But my best friend says that this is old-fashioned, and that women should not do it.

Who is right?

A Your friend is right. Douching means washing out the vagina with water or some other fluid. It used to be common, particularly in rural areas, because people (not unreasonably) thought it was a 'clean' thing to do.

But these days, gynaecologists do not think that douching is a good idea. It can introduce germs into the vagina, and it will often 'wash out' essential protective chemicals and micro-organisms from the vagina, and also alter its acid-alkali balance. There is some evidence that it increases the chances of getting infections in the tubes.

So I would not advise doing it.

 

How can I get her to orgasm easily?

 

Q Doc, I am eager to please my new wife in bed! I read on a British website that in order to help the woman orgasm, it is often a good idea to have sex with her from behind.

Why is this, please? I do not understand.

A The main reason why this position is sometimes helpful is that the man can easily reach round and use his hand to stimulate his partner's clitoris during sex.

You see, many other sex positions (including the traditional 'face-to-face') make it very difficult for the man to get his fingertips on to the woman's clitoral region. And some sort of stimulation of the clitoris is usually essential in order to help women to orgasm.

deardoc@gleanerjm.com