Thu | Aug 17, 2017

No faith in basketball association

Published:Saturday | February 6, 2016 | 2:00 AMLivingston Scott
Broomfield

Some major players in local basketball have expressed grave disappointment in Mark Broomfield's administration after a year in office.

Urban Knights' Gordon Porter and Pete Matthews of Runnin Rebels say basketball is in its worst state in 10 years and that there is no confidence in the administration and its president to attract sponsorship or support of any kind.

Porter and Matthews highlighted declines in the sport and the implications of not having a top-flight tournament. The National Basketball League (NBL) will have been out of commission for three seasons this August.

Both agreed there is no faith in the administration and its leadership but are willing to give Broomfield time before they consider a no-confidence vote, though they insist that something needs to happen fast.

"The major problem the association faces is negative perception. Corporate Jamaica has no confidence in the leadership, and it's pertaining to what happened in the previous administration, so the present administration is having a hard time convincing the corporate sector to come on board.

"As a consequence, the NBL has not restarted, and it is causing other problems because top players are not able to compete at the highest level. Players have not played in two years, others are playing in the lower leagues, and it's creating all sorts of issues as it's filtering over to other competitions and it has serious implications for basketball," he reasoned.

The general lack of sponsorship and a flagship tournament are having a dire impact on the sport's development, said Matthews, who believes that they might have to revamp from the grass-roots level.

NO SPONSORSHIP

"There is absolutely no sponsorship, and the present administration cannot garner any money, so we don't know what is going to happen. I can wholeheartedly say I have no confidence in the administration.

"We have players sitting down three years, getting fat, players who were coming along, and now there is no top-level league for them to compete in because corporate Jamaica has no confidence in the association, so we are wondering what is going to happen to basketball," he insisted.

Broomfield said that the accusations are not entirely true and insisted that they are slowly trying to rebuild corporate Jamaica's confidence, but it's taking time.

"How do you gain confidence? To rebuild a sport that has sustained certain damage requires more than a sponsor. I am one hundred per cent sure the corporate community doesn't question my integrity. Our annual financial statements for 2013-2014 are out and our books are open for those who want to look. That is the only way we can regain confidence. We have to rebrand what we have in this tight economic space, and it requires sacrifice," he said.