Sun | Sep 24, 2017

Tennis Jamaica disputes Azar’s claims

Published:Friday | February 26, 2016 | 2:00 AMDania Bogle

Tennis Jamaica have responded to comments made by John Azar published in yesterday's Gleaner.

In the article, Azar contended that he was legitimately elected in the abandoned election and described the over-voting as a deliberate attempt by the administration to compromise the process.

In a response via press release, Tennis Jamaica president, John Bailey, said the association "remains committed to proper governance of the association and an electoral process that is transparent and fair".

It also said it rejected Azar's accusations.

"With regards to the disputed ballots, neither Mr Azar nor the administration of Tennis Jamaica is in a position to establish which ballots were compromised, as the exercise was based on secret ballots that were not marked for identification purposes."

It added that affidavits from persons purporting to vote for Azar would be inadequate replacements for ballots that may be in dispute.

"Persons may, for their own benefit, give incorrect or untruthful responses after the fact."

The releases added: "It is in the pursuit of this, that - after consultation with our board and taking advice from competent persons - we decided to go the route of holding fresh elections to secure a new administration, following the last exercise on November 19, 2015 which had to be terminated due to the action of some unscrupulous members. This, amid the fact that the methodology used then to govern the elections was the usual.

"On that occasion, conducting a re-vote was not possible as the meeting had broken down and a number of members had left the premises."

Tennis Jamaica asserted that the current approach is one that it believed would satisfy the requirements of all "well-thinking members of the association and persons who love the sport of tennis.

The release added that Tennis Jamaica had secured the services of Jamaica Olympic Association to organise and administer the fresh elections set for March "in a way to remove any doubt as to the integrity of the proposed elections".