Sun | Sep 24, 2017

Edwin Allen cultures winning ‘habit’

Published:Monday | March 21, 2016 | 3:06 AMLivingston Scott
Edwin Allen High School's track and field athletes celebrating their victory on the final day of the ISSA/GraceKennedy Boys and Girls' Athletic Championships at the National Stadium on Saturday.
An Edwin Allen High School athlete displaying the school's 'Blue Blood' spirit, which head coach Michael Dyke says is contributing to their current trend of title successes at Champs.
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Edwin Allen claimed their third successive Girls Championship title and their fourth overall after tallying 329.5 points, finishing well clear of Hydel High (263) and St Jago High (241.5) at the Inter-Secondary Schools Sports Association (ISSA)/GraceKennedy Boys and Girls’ Athletic Championships at the National Stadium last week.
Their head coach, Michael Clarke, revealed that the reason for this trend is because they have developed a habit of winning and work for nothing less each year.
"It (winning) has become a part of us and they say winning will become a habit and it is pretty much a habit for us at this point in time. I think it would have been very devastating had we lost the championship because the girls have worked very hard, along with the coaching staff, management, everybody. We put our all into it and we’ve got the just rewards," Dyke said.
He also disclosed that their initiation to the Edwin Allen culture starts from the moment they walk through the gates of the Frankfield-based institution and even though they won by 66 points, Dyke thought it was a far from perfect championship for them.
"As they get into the programme we teach them the sort of discipline we instil in the girls, so they pretty much learn from the seniors very quickly and knowing that we are a winning team, a champion team, as they enter their blood becomes blue and they are ready to start the role," he continued.
"We had disappointments throughout the championship, but in the end we are very happy. It doesn't matter the margin (of victory), what is important is that we are still the champions, we are the 2016 champions. We did very well in the sprints and middle distances, but our throws were not what we anticipated. But we were able to pull it off, so it's for us to look at where our strength and weaknesses lies and build on our weaknesses going forward," he said.
With the winning mentality and culture firmly laid at the Clarendon school, Dyke is confident they can go for a four-peat in 2017.
"We take it in stride year by year. I am not going to put my head on the block, but we will be working hard to retain our title next year," he added.