Tue | Sep 26, 2017

Dottin hits out at pay disparity

Published:Sunday | April 24, 2016 | 4:00 AM
Dottin

BRIDGETOWN,

Barbados (CMC):

Marquee West Indies Women's batsman Deandra Dottin has complained about the disparity in pay between men's and women's players and says she may be forced to take up alternative employment if the situation is not addressed.

Citing the example of the respective payouts for the winners at the recent Twenty20 World Cup in India, the 24-year-old Dottin labelled the disparity as "ridiculous" and said it was "discouraging".

West Indies men's side pocketed US$1.6 million for beating England in the final of the tournament, while their women counterparts won a mere US$100,000.

"Barbados does not really give sports people - and from my point of view, women - the recognition and respect they need," Dottin told Barbados Today online.

"We were actually World champions and a lot of people feel we are getting all of this big money and the payment is equal to the men. That is not so."

She added: "In order for cricket to be better, you need to treat everybody as one. You can't treat the men at a high level and the women at a much lower level. You (women) only have the fame and the name.

more money

"We women need to be treated way better than we are being treated - money-wise and respect. Regional male cricketers make more money than West Indies women in cricket."

Dottin is one of the most senior players on the women's side, having played 90 one-day internationals and 88 Twenty20 Internationals.

She became the first woman to score a T20 hundred as she scorched 112 off South Africa Women when the Caribbean hosted the T20 World Cup six years ago.

Dottin is one of 11 West Indies women's players with West Indies Cricket Board retainer contracts, which range from US$1,500 to $3,000 per month.

In contrast, the men's contracts are worth anywhere from US$100,000 up to nearly $150,000.

The Barbadian Dottin said with the current of affairs, she may have to resort to playing cricket part-time.

"This sort of treatment would discourage anybody from playing cricket. Right now, as a person who plays cricket full-time and loves cricket, I am looking for something else to do," she said.

"And if what I choose to do brings me more income and makes life better for me, I will play cricket part-time. They will not get my full dedication anymore."