Sat | Aug 19, 2017

Mullings wants to bring title back home

Published:Wednesday | July 26, 2017 | 7:00 AMRachid Parchment
Mullings

Whether the Wray and Nephew Contender Series title returns to Jamaica or stays away for at least another year will be decided this evening as Sakima 'The Mauler' Mullings faces Phil 'The Assassin' Rose at the Mico University College.

Mullings, representing Jamaica, booked his spot in the final after wins over Canadians Winston Matthews and Larone Whyte. Then compatriot Tsetsi Davis, Rose, who represents Canada, secured his place with wins over Ricardo Planter, countryman Dave Leblond and last year's beaten finalist Richard Holmes.

Mullings had previously said that winning tonight meant a lot to him as he made a promise to Jamaica to bring the title back to the country after it was won by American DeMarcus 'Chop Chop' Corley last season. Apart from the $2 million prize on offer, Mullings also wants the win to be the first two-time Contender champion, and also to put himself in a better negotiating position to set up a fight with Corley in the future.

Mullings is aware of the size difference between himself and Rose and said that in order to win, he would have to be calculated in his approach.

 

Physical factor

 

"Based on physicality, he's definitely the bigger, stronger man than me," he said. "So, it's a fight where we're (Mullings and his team) goingto have to use more brain than brawn to win. I'm not overly concerned with anything that Phil Rose is going to do. Our aim going into the fight is to neutralise his strength."

Mullings told The Gleaner that he is well aware that Rose has many advantages over him but not experience.

"When you look at the tale of the tape, everything is in his favour, but not experience. So as an experienced fighter, I'm going to have to turn all the other criteria in my favour the height, the reach, the size, and the physicality. I'm going to have to use all of that against him."

Rose, on the other hand, said that he has Mullings well scouted.

"He made it to the final round, so it's expected that he's gonna be the hardest competition," he said. "He is a boxer, he's slick, he moves. I can't make any mistakes because I know he's going to capitalise on them, so I have to fight smart. But I see his fights online, I do my research. I see the little holes and stuff that I can exploit."