Mon | Oct 23, 2017

Drivers divided over F1 halo cockpit device

Published:Friday | July 28, 2017 | 12:00 AM
German Formula One driver Sebastian Vettel.

BUDAPEST, Hungary (AP):

The 'halo' cockpit head protection system that will be mandatory on Formula One cars next season protects drivers from the potentially fatal impact of objects like a loose wheel travelling at up to 225 kph (140 mph).

Motorsport's governing body, FIA, has been looking at ways to improve cockpit protection and limit the risk of head injuries, after French F1 driver Jules Bianchi died in July 2015 and British IndyCar driver Justin Wilson died a month later.

"The halo will become the strongest part of the car, a secondary wall structure (along with the helmet) and can take about 15 times the car's weight," FIA safety director Laurent Mekies said at a news conference yesterday. "We know that our resistance against small objects has stepped up."

Drivers remain divided over the move.

The halo design forms a semicircular barrier around the driver's helmet in the front half of the cockpit, protecting against debris without completely closing the cockpit. When first tested ahead of 2016, drivers were split as to whether they liked it with some - such as three-time F1 champion Lewis Hamilton - criticising it on aesthetic grounds.

Tests were done from the front and side of the car with a loose wheel weighing 20kg. Researchers took in various factors: car-to-car contact, car-to-environment contact and external objects, such as a wheel. They also analysed real-life accidents, including those with fatalities.

In terms of manufacturing design, FIA race director Charlie Whiting said "it's going to be a one-part (piece) made by one company, so they all have to fit the same one."

The device is expected to weigh about 8kg, Whiting said. The manufacturer has yet to be decided, although several companies have been contacted. Hamilton and his Mercedes teammate Valtteri Bottas both expressed concern that the extra weight will impact driving, particularly on cornering speeds.

Other safety devices were considered before the halo was approved by the FIA last week.

At the British Grand Prix two weeks ago, a transparent open canopy system constructed using polycarbonate, and known as the "shield," was tested at Silverstone by four-time F1 champion Sebastian Vettel.

The Ferrari driver was critical.

"I wasn't a big fan of the shield," Vettel said. "For sure you need to get used to the halo, but at least it didn't impact on the vision."