Mon | Oct 23, 2017

Wint expected to replace Grant as JFF gen-sec

Published:Tuesday | September 19, 2017 | 12:00 AMLivingston Scott

Manchester Football Association (FA) President Dalton Wint is the front runner to become to new general secretary of the Jamaica Football Federation (JFF), with current General Secretary Raymond Grant set to demit office in the not-too-distant future.

Wint, an electrical engineer by profession, has been head of the Manchester FA for the last eight years. He has served on and off as a JFF board member since 2003, and is currently the general secretary of the South Central Confederation.

However, with Grant stepping aside, Wint and the new JFF president, Michael Ricketts, have admitted that there have been ongoing discussions.

"Yes, I am in discussions," Wint told The Gleaner. "It will be done soon. But there is a process, and we are making sure we go through that process. It can't say how soon, as it's the prerogative of the president, but I am ready," he stated.

 

BOARD TO DISCUSS MATTER

 

Ricketts stated that after they have finalised discussions, a release will be sent out.

"This is something the board will have to look at, but any announcement will be made shortly. This is something that has to be discussed by the board. We have had discussions, and of course, in our minds, we are looking at persons, but there ought to be a period of transition, so we will still have discussions as it relates to Raymond (Grant) demitting office. We will make a release when the time comes, but we cannot continue to speculate in the media," he commented.

Meanwhile, Wint added that he is ready to make the sacrifice required.

"I have made myself available, and I am enthused. There will be long hours, and I will have to part company with a lot of things I am involved in, but I am up for it," he said.

Grant, an engineer with the Government in Portland, was on secondment to the JFF as general secretary since 2014 and twice had it extended. However, the Portland FA president had long complained that working between Portland and Kingston was a great challenge and had tendered his resignation on at least three occasions, but each time, he was convinced by the late president, Horace Burrell, to stay on.