Wed | Dec 13, 2017

Barca at centre of political dispute

Published:Saturday | September 30, 2017 | 12:00 AM
Barcelona players stand for a minute of silence for the victims of recent van attacks before a La Liga football match against Real Betis at the Camp Nou stadium in Barcelona, Spain.
In this Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017 photo, the Camp Nou stadium is illuminated in Barcelona, Spain.
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BARCELONA, Spain (AP):

Politics and football will merge today when Barcelona become more than just a football club for Catalonia's separatists.

Barcelona's home match against Las Palmas falls on the day when the region's secessionist leaders have vowed to defy authorities and hold a disputed referendum on independence from Spain.

The Spanish government calls the vote illegal and has ordered a crackdown to stop any ballots from being cast, sparking protests in the streets and universities.

The dispute has increased tensions in the proud and prosperous region to fever pitch and Barcelona's Camp Nou Stadium will be no exception.

"It won't be a normal day, it will be a historic day for the country, but we have to treat the football match like any other," Barcelona vice-president Jordi Cardoner said. "We will carry the Catalan flag's (red and yellow) colours on the collars of our shirts and in our hearts."

 

Rallying point

 

Europe's largest stadium at nearly 100,000 seats, Camp Nou has become a rallying point for Catalan nationalists in recent years with the boom in support for a break from Spain that polls show has reached roughly half of the region's 7.5 million residents.

Spain's King Felipe VI met with deafening jeers at Camp Nou at the final of the Copa del Rey in 2015, and the chants of "Independence!" that are a fixed feature of every home match are set to be at maximum volume come tomorrow.

Given the supercharged atmosphere, the club has called for calm and for the spirit of sport to prevail.

"We are not uncomfortable with the date of the match. It's an important day for Catalonia and the interests of Barca have to be compatible with the majority of Catalans," Cardoner said. "I believe that each one of our members and fans can express whatever they want, but we ask them to do it respectfully. We are focusing on the competition. We all want to win the match."

Barcelona defender Gerard Pique is also giving advice.

"From today until Sunday we will express ourselves pacifically," Pique tweeted on Thursday. "Don't give them any excuse (for a crackdown). That's what they want. And sing loud and clear."

Pique and the rest of Barcelona's players have good reason not to get distracted by the whirlwind of politics and police activity. The team is on an eight-game winning run, leads the league, and holds a seven-point advantage over fierce rivals Real Madrid in sixth place.

Barcelona's football club became identified as a bastion of Catalan culture during the repressive years of Gen Francisco Franco's dictatorship from 1939-1975, when the Catalan language, which is spoken alongside Spanish, was banned from schools and public use. Its slogan 'More than a club' has come to mean for many its commitment to Catalonia.

In the past four decades, Catalonia has gained a large degree of self-governance and boasts one of the strongest economies of the southern European country. Still, many Catalans feel disrespected by the central government in Madrid and complain that they pay more in taxes than they receive back in public spending.

Barcelona's rivalry with Real Madrid carries political overtones for many, with 'Barca' representing Catalonia and Real Madrid standing in for the rest of Spain.