Wed | Dec 19, 2018

NBA preps for expanded betting on games

Published:Wednesday | July 18, 2018 | 12:00 AM
Silver

LAS VEGAS (AP):

Here's a scenario: LeBron James is four assists and three rebounds shy of a triple-double after three quarters. A bettor, who is watching at home and utilising a mobile app, decides to gamble that James will get those assists and rebounds in the final 12 minutes. The wager then gets made before play resumes.

The NBA wants that bettor to see the best possible data.

So the league is seeking to get stats out quicker than ever.

Fast isn't fast enough for the NBA anymore, not when it comes to stats - especially now that the US Supreme Court has opened the door for states to allow wagering on games. The league has upgraded its stat systems in the past year to try and get its data out as close to real-time as possible, even aiming to beat the typical lag of 7-15 seconds that it takes for television or streaming services to show whatever happened.

It's about what the NBA calls official data. The league's stance is that getting accurate stats to bettors is critical so the player knows what they're betting on and the casinos will know when to pay out or not. But how much value that data has for casinos - and whether they will pay anything for it - remains unclear.

"My view is we should be compensated for our intellectual property, but we can do that directly, again, with commercial relationships with gaming establishments," said NBA Commissioner Adam Silver, whose league had hoped this matter would be resolved with federal regulation instead of various policies getting worked on state by state by state.

Silver met with betting officials in Las Vegas earlier this month, and how data should be provided was one of the topics on the agenda. The NBA has said it is seeking a one per cent "integrity fee" on wagers, which the league said would offset their additional security costs and compensate them for the data they can provide.

 

CASINOS

 

The casinos, however, are balking at legislative mandates insisting upon the use of official data. Joe Asher, the CEO of bookmaker William Hill USA, told The New York Times that such a mandate "sets up monopoly pricing power. This whole thing of official league data is like a smoke screen."

It's a major issue to work through, especially if in-game betting - people betting on various aspects of games after they've already started - catches on in the United States the same way that it has in the United Kingdom.

In-game betting, which is huge in Europe, is still relatively small in this country. Most Nevada bookmakers say in-game options make up no more than five per cent of their sports-wagering business, although William Hill has said it accounted for nearly 25 percent of its sports business in the US during 2017.

Only a handful of states have legalised sports betting since the Supreme Court decision in May, though several more states are expected to get operations up and running in the next year or so. Bettors now have been largely playing the basics - will Team X beat Team Y by more than six points, will the teams combine to score more than 210 points, that sort of thing.

"There's a couple of things about official data that make it advantageous for sports betting," said Scott Kaufman-Ross, an NBA vice president who oversees fantasy sports and gaming. "Most is the speed. ... That's important for in-game betting."