Fri | Aug 18, 2017

Bright Sparkes | Etiquette and Ladylike traditions that still apply today

Published:Tuesday | May 24, 2016 | 5:00 AM

(Part One of two parts)

Acting like a lady is carrying yourself with dignity, which also empowers a man to be a gentleman.

Many of us want a true gentleman, but I believe we hold the power to the way we are treated in our hands. It's the law of attraction and common sense: If we want a gentleman, we must be and act like a lady.

In all areas of life, I believe being a lady displays self-respect, class, appreciation, and etiquette. It also allows you to enjoy the niceties of life with the ease of knowing how to act in all situations. You don't have to come from wealth or be wealthy in order to conduct yourself like royalty.

After doing some new research and also recalling my background, which includes etiquette certification, here are 21 lost lady-like traditions that still apply today:

 

Manners

 

1. If a man knows that it is etiquette to remain standing until you are seated, be sure to sit promptly so as to not leave him standing too long.

2. No rude or shocking language, especially at the table. Your language is a representation of your mind and heart.

3. Don't talk with your mouth full. I don't need to explain this one.

4. She dresses tastefully: A lady dresses appropriately for the occasion.

5. Phone calls: When in doubt, a good rule of thumb is not to make phone calls before 9 a.m. or after 9 p.m.

6. She is gracious: She never just says "hello" when being introduced to someone. She offers a kind greeting like "it's a pleasure to meet you" or "how are you this evening?"

7. She turns her phone on silent and puts it away for meals, meetings, and church.

8. She says "yes, please" or "no, thank you." She does not say "yep" or "nope."

9. She gives compliments with sincerity and only when she means it. She does not say things just to say them. Insincerity is easier to read than we think.

10. A lady offers to help someone in need. Being a lady starts with how you treat yourself and others. She offers her seat to the elderly, disabled, or a parent with small children.

Ps. Part Two will appear next week.